Introductions

Start with this:

 

1.  Most anecdotes only capture a little moment in time. 
2.  Select a moment that can be used as an example of a larger point of your essay, like a silly, sweet, innocent interaction between two people can seal their friendship. 
3.  Set the scene using descriptive language and details and tell us the 5W’s–the who, the what, the when, the where, and the why.
4.  Include a snippet or line of dialogue to give the introduction its story-like quality.  
5.  Also include a tiny scene of action to inject it with drama.
6.  Write anecdotes in the 1st person: I, we, us.

APPROACH #1:  USE A STORY/ANECDOTE
Anecdotes are a great way to capture your reader’s attention.  Best way to run these is to select the tenderest moments that you can use to make a point or convey your message. Look for real-life examples that illustrate a point you want to make.  This makes some good points too.

APPROACH #2: OPPOSE AN ARGUMENT THAT HAS ALREADY BEEN DEVELOPED

APPROACH #3: ASK A SERIES OF QUESTIONS

APPROACH #4: USE A CATCHY QUOTATION

APPROACH #5: REFUTE A COMMON BELIEF OR ASSUMPTION.

APPROACH #6: USE A CATCHY FACT OR STATISTIC.

WRITING AN INTRODUCTION FOR STANDARD ESSAYS

WHAT’S THE FUNCTION OF AN INTRODUCTION?

To let the reader know what the issue is that you’ll be discussing—what the essay is about.

To present background information that may be necessary to help explain what the issue is. 

To let the reader know what your main conclusion will be—state your thesis.

To let the reader know what to expect in the remainder of the essay—give a “roadmap” of how the argument will proceed.

Make sure that you do in the essay what you said you do in the introduction. The introduction sets up expectations for the reader and you want to do your best to fulfill those expectations.

WHAT’S NOT IN THE INTRODUCTION?

The introduction is NOT the place to present ARGUMENTS that really belong in the main body of the essay.

Introduction is for setting up the main argument, providing background and context, so the reader is prepared to understand and follow the arguments in the main body.  Once you start giving premises and considering objections that pertain to the main thesis, you’re not introducing your essay anymore.

Introductions will often require more than one paragraph—that’s why “Introductory section” is a more helpful term than “introductory paragraph.”

FOR ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAYS
This was pretty good too.  You just have to be patient with it.

 

The author of the above video, Kevin deLaplante, teaches writing at Udemy and has a YouTube channel.   

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