1960’s Counterculture

1960’s COUNTERCULTURE
1.  An excellent post by Charles Burris on Saturday, June 10, 2017 over at LewRockwell.com.  The Strange But Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation reviews a book, Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon: Laurel Canyon, Covert Ops, & The Dark Heart of the Hippie Dream, David McGowan & Nick Bryant, 2014. Here is the “searing but always engaging expose “Inside the LC: The Strange But Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation.”

The late David McGowan was the highly-acclaimed author of the underground revisionist classic on the 1960s-1970s counter-culture’s effect on American rock’ n’ roll music, Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon: Laurel Canyon, Covert Ops and the Dark Heart of the Hippie Dream. Before it was published in book form, this searing but always engaging expose’ was available online as Inside The LC: The Strange but Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation. What you know is wrong – find out the real shocking story of how you were manipulated by one of the most successful mind-control endeavors. Reading this compelling, mind-blowing account will truly change your life forever and how you view this seminal time in cultural world history.

Here is the cogent description of the text from the back cover:  (MORE…)
2.  Astral Weeks: A Secret History of 1968, Ryan H. Walsh, 2018.  Jason Kottke explains.
3.  The Covert War Against Rock: What You Don’t Know About the Deaths of Jim Morrison, Tupac Shakur, Michael Hutchence, Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Phil Ochs, Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, John Lennon, and others, Alex Constantine, 2000.
4.  The Essential Mae Brussell: Investigations of Fascism in America, Mae Brussell, 
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ARTICLES ON 1960S COUNTERCULTURE
1. The Miracle of Van Morrison’s “Astral Weeks,” John Michoud, The New Yorker, March 3, 2018.
2.  “Operation Chaos,” Mae Brussell, 1976.
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COUNTERCULTURE, THE MOVEMENT
1. “The Next Recession and the Work Ethics,” Gary North, February 23, 2018

But all around the West, the good times that have prevailed since 1946 have produced new generations that are not imbued with the work ethic that Western civilization had prior to World War II and immediately after the war. I’m not sure when the change came, but certainly in the second half of the 1960’s, we began to see it in articles about the youth culture. Remember, however, that the youth culture or counterculture was limited. It was not representative of the vast majority of American young adults. The vast majority of American young men went to work or college after high school. But most of them wanted to stay out of the Vietnam War after 1967. So, they shared the anti-war outlook of the hippie, counterculture activists.

The best description of the post-1970 activists can be found in David Brooks’ book, BoBos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There (2000). Bobos are the people who have combined the Bohemian mindset with the bourgeois mindset. This reflects what in retrospect has become known as the “me decade” of the 1970’s. (The phrase was coined by Tom Wolfe.) That shift fundamentally changed American culture and Western culture. The social disruptions between 1970 and 1980 changed Western society. New attitudes towards wealth became dominant. New attitudes towards work also became dominant. The Puritan work ethic got bad press after 1970. That bad press, when coupled with Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society welfare programs, led to the undermining of the older work ethic in the lower middle class white culture. The best book on this is Charles Murray’s Coming Apart (2012).

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