Books

GRADES 7-8
1.  Shane, the novel, written by Jack Schaefer, 1949.
2.  The Silver Chair, 1953, is written by C.S. (Clive Staples or “Jack”) Lewis.
3.  Farmer Boy, 1933, is written by Laura Ingalls Wilder.
4.  The Hardy Boys series, 1927-1959, is a series created by Edward Stratemeyer.
5.  The Rover Boys, 1899-1926, a series created by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudynom for Edward Stratemeyer.
6.  James and the Giant Peach, Roald Dahl, 1961.
7.  Hans Brinker or The Silver Skates by Mary Mapes Dodge, 1865.  Here is a LibriVox recording in case you wanted to list to the story.
8.  50 Best Books for Boys.
9.  A good list of classics.
10.  Adventure stories for Boys!
11.  100 Must-Read Books:  The Essential Man’s Library.
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AMERICAN LITERATURE
American Literature, the Colonial Period, 1620s–1776.

Start here.

1791, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Franklin.

1812, With the War of 1812 and an increasing desire to produce uniquely American literature and culture, a number of key new literary figures emerged, perhaps most prominently Washington Irving and Edgar Allan Poe.

1820, The Legend of the Sleepy Hollow, Washington Irving.

1826, The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757, James Fenimore Cooper.
1836, In 1836, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882) started a movement known as Transcendentalism. Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862) wrote Walden, which urges resistance to the dictates of organized society. The political conflict surrounding abolitionism inspired the writings of William Lloyd Garrison and Harriet Beecher Stowe in her world-famous Uncle Tom’s Cabin. These efforts were supported by the continuation of the slave narrative autobiography, of which the best known example from this period was Frederick Douglass‘s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.

1845, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas, Frederick Douglas.
1850, The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne.
1851, Moby Dick, Herman Melville.
1852, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe.
1855, Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman.
1855, My Bondage and My Freedom, Frederick Douglas.

1855, The Song of Hiawatha, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

1860, Paul Revere’s Ride, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

1865Hans Brinker or the Silver Skates, Mary Mapes Dodge.
1881, The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James.
1884, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain.

1888The Young Acrobat, Horatio Alger, Jr.
1893, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, Stephen Crane.
1895, The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane.
1898, The Turn of the Screw, Henry James.
1900, Sister Carrie, Theodore Dreiser.
1902, The Wings of the Dove, Henry James.
1903, The Ambassadors, Henry James.
1903, The People of the Abyss, Jack London.
1903, Call of the Wild, Jack London.
1904, The Golden Bowl, Henry James.
1905, The House of Mirth, Edith Warton.
1906, White Fang, Jack London.
1908, “To Build a Fire,” Jack London.
1908, The Iron Heel, Jack London.
1909, Three Lives, Gertrude Stein.
1911, Ethan Frome, Edith Warton.
1913, O Pioneers!, Willa Cather.
1918,  My Antonia, Willa Cather.
1920, This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
1920, The Age of Innocence, Edith Warton.
1922, The Beautiful and the Damned, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
1924, Billy Budd, Herman Melville, published postumously in 1924.
1924, The Making of Americans, Gertrude Stein.
1925, An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser.
1925, The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
1927, The Bridge of San Luis Rey, Thornton Wilder.
1929, A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway.

1931, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley.
1933,  Farmer Boy, Laura Ingalls Wilder.
1934, Tender Is the Night, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
1935, Lucy Gayheart, Willa Cather.
1944, The Glass Menagerie, Tennessee Williams.
1947, A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams.

1948, “The Lottery,” Shirley Jackson.

1948, The Naked and the Dead, Norman Mailer.
1949Shane, Jack Schaefer.
1949, Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller.
1951, The Catcher in the Rye, J. D. Salinger.
1952, The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway.
1953, The Crucible, Arthur Miller.

1953, The Adventures of Augie March, Saul Bellow. [He was Canadian]

1953, Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury.

1957, On the Road, Jack Kerouac.
1960, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee.

1962, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey.

1964, I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, Hannah Green.

1964, Herzog, Saul Bellow.

1965, An American Dream, Norman Mailer.

1979, The Executioner’s Song, Norman Mailer.

1991, Harlot’s Ghost, Norman Mailer.

1996, The Notebook, Nicholas Sparks.

2002, The Lovely Bones, Alice Sebold.

2005, No Country for Old MenCormac McCarthy.

BRITISH LITERATURE
1937, The Hobbit or There and Back and Again, J.R.R. Tolkien.

1937, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, J.R.R. Tolkien.  from Wikipedia, “The story began as a sequel to Tolkien’s 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually developed into a much larger work. Written in stages between 1937 and 1949, The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling novels ever written, with over 150 million copies sold.”

1945, Animal Farm, George Orwell.

1946, Politics and the English Language, George Orwell.

1949, Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell.

1950The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C. S. Lewis.  The audio/podcast reading of LW&W is quite good.

HOW ENGLISH COURSES WERE TAUGHT
Start here.

Reading Guides for C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien:
1. List of Creatures in Narnia.
2. Animal & plant guide to The Lord of the Rings.
3. 10 Best Tolkien Monsters.
4. The Hobbit character list.
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 GRADES 9-12
1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.  Gone with the Wind is a better story.  And if you’re going to teach TKAM, you’ll need to address the insufferable Civil Rights movement.  Be sure to read this, know something about Emmett Till’s father, know how all rights stem from property rights when you try to wax on about the significance of civil rights selectively enforced by government.
2. 1984 by George Orwell.
3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.
4. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.
6. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy.  Here is an audio from LibriVox.
7.  War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy.  Here is a LibriVox recording of War and Peace.

FIND BOOKS HERE
1. LibriVox.  This is a pretty cool service.  This is a catalog of audio recordings of not only books on tape but short stories on tape as well.  It is extensive.  Also, if you’re so inclined, the service also offers opportunities for you to perform readings.  Something to think about.
2.  Biblio.
3.  Abe Books.
4.  Amazon.
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PHONICS
1. Sam Blumenfield

GED
1.  McGraw-Hill’s GED, The Most Complete and Reliable Study Program for the GED Tests [Paperback].
2.  SAT Study Guides.
3.  SAT II Subject Test.
4.  ACT Study Guides.
5.  Ray’s Arithmetic.
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1960’s COUNTERCULTURE
1.  An excellent post by Charles Burris on Saturday, June 10, 2017 over at LewRockwell.com.  The Strange But Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation reviews a book, Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon: Laurel Canyon, Covert Ops, & The Dark Heart of the Hippie Dream, David McGowan & Nick Bryant, 2014. Here is the “searing but always engaging expose “Inside the LC: The Strange But Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation.”

The late David McGowan was the highly-acclaimed author of the underground revisionist classic on the 1960s-1970s counter-culture’s effect on American rock’ n’ roll music, Weird Scenes Inside the Canyon: Laurel Canyon, Covert Ops and the Dark Heart of the Hippie Dream. Before it was published in book form, this searing but always engaging expose’ was available online as Inside The LC: The Strange but Mostly True Story of Laurel Canyon and the Birth of the Hippie Generation. What you know is wrong – find out the real shocking story of how you were manipulated by one of the most successful mind-control endeavors. Reading this compelling, mind-blowing account will truly change your life forever and how you view this seminal time in cultural world history.

Here is the cogent description of the text from the back cover:  (more…)
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ADVERTISING
1.  Breakthrough Advertising, Eurgene M. Schwartz, 2004.
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2nd AMENDMENT
1.  The Founders’ Second Amendment: Origins of the Right to Bear Arms, Stephen Halbrook, 2012.
2.  Gun Control in the 3rd Reich: Disarming the Jews and Enemies of the State, Stephen Halbrook, 2014.
3. More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws, John Lott, 2010.
4. More books on the 2nd Amendment.

AMERICAN HISTORY
1.  In Plain Sight: Old World Records in Ancient America, Gloria Farley, 1993.  The “Before Columbus” section came recommended.
2. America Revised, Frances Fitzgerald, 1979.

Old textbooks are not kept by libraries. If you want to study the history of what the public schools have taught, or what universities have taught, or what communities of scholars generally believed, you have to have access to the older textbooks. You have to compare older textbooks with newer textbooks. But in my entire academic career, I have only seen one book that did this: Frances Fitzgerald’s book, America Revised. It is a history of public school textbooks on American history. Nobody else had attempted this before. It was not easy to do, since research libraries don’t keep old textbooks, especially high school textbooks. The public schools don’t keep them, either. They are tossed out when they are too old to use any more.

3.  Fame and the Founding Fathers, Douglas Adair, 1998.
4.  Paul Revere and the World He Lived In, Esther Hoskins Forbes, 1999.
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AMERICAN MANUFACTURING
1.  The Puritan Gift: The Reclaiming the American Dream Amnidst Global Financial Chaos, Kenneth Hopper, William Hopper, & Russell L. Ackoff, 2009.
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AMERICAN REVOLUTION
1.  Ideological Origins of the American Revolution, Bernard Bailyn, 1967.
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ANARCHO-CAPITALIST BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Provided by Walter Block.
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ANTHROPOLOGY
1.  The Naked Ape, Desmond Morris, 1967.
2.  Peoplewatching, The Desmond Morris Guide  to Body Language, 1977.
3.  Babywatching, Desmond Morris, 1991.
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ASSASSINATIONS
1.  The Plot to Kill King:  The Truth Behind the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. William F. Pepper, 2016.
2.  Murder from Within: Lyndon Johnson’s Plot Against President Kennedy, Fred Newcomb, 1974.
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BANKING
1.  Banking and the Business Cycle: A Study of the Great Depression in the United States, C. A. Phillips, F. T. McManus, R. W. Nelson, 2014.
2.  Andrew Jackson by Robert Remini.
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BIOGRAPHIES
1.  Chronicles of Wasted Time, Malcolm Muggeridge, 2006.
2.  Frederick II, Enrst Kantorowitz, 1937.
3.  The Unknown Karl Marx, Robert Payne, 1971.
4.  The Puritan Dilemma (John Winthrop), Edmund Morgan, 2006.
5.  John Adams, David McCullough, 2002.
6.  The Founding Father: The Story of Joseph P. Kennedy: A Study in Power, Wealth, and Family Ambition, Richard J. Whalen, 1993.
7.  John Tyler, The Accidental President, Edward P. Crapol, 2012.
8.  John Randolph of Roanoke, American Conservative.
9.  Skeptical Politic of Herbert Butterfield, David Gordon, 2012.
10.  Goldwater: The Man Who Made a Revolution, Lee Edwards, 2015.
11.  James I: Fool as King, Otto Scott, 1976.
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BUREAUCRACIES
1.  Oriental Despotism: A Comparative Study of Total Power, Karl Wittfogel, 1981.
2.  Bureaucracy, Ludwig von Mises, 1944.
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BUSINESS
1. Start Your Own Home Business After 50: How to Survive, Thrive and Earn the Income You Deserve, Bob Bly, 2013.
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CAPITALISM
1.  The Return of the Primitive: The Anti-Industrial Revolution, Ayn Rand, 1971.
2.  The Anti-Capitalist Mentality, Ludwig von Mises, 1956.  Here is a copy of it at Mises.
3.  The Naked Capitalist, Cleon Skousen, 1970.
4.  The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith, 1776.
5.  “The Anatomy of a Bank Run,” MurrayRothbard, 1985.
6.  Competition and Entrepreneurship, Israel M. Kirzner,  1978.
7.  Post-Capitalist Society, Peter F. Drucker, 1994.
8.  The Roots of Capitalism, John Chamberlain, 1977.
9.  Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America, Michael Ruhlman, 2017.  From Don Boudreaux’s Cafe Hayek

The great improvement in food retailing in America over the past few decades strongly suggests that the average American supermarket’s customers in 2017 – namely, average Americans – are substantially wealthier than were their counterparts of 40 or so years ago.

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CAR BUYING
1.  Don’t Get Taken Every Time: The Ultimate Guide to Buying or Leasing a Car in the Showroom or on the Internet, Remar Sutton, 2001.
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CHRISTIANITY
1. The Authority of the Bibleand the Rise of the Modern World, Henning Graf Reventlow
2. The Death of Meaning, Rousas John Rushdoony.
3. The Rise and Growth of the Anglican Schism, Rev. Fr. Dr. Nicholas Sander.
4. Protestant Reformation.
5. The Death of Christian Culture, John Senior.
6. Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt-Manipulators: A Biblical Response to Ronald J. Siderby David Chilton.
7. Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger: A Biblical Studyby Ronald J. Sider.
8. Moses and Pharoah, Gary North.
9. Radicalism as Therapy, Robert Nisbett.
10. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn, 1962.
During the early years of the Vietnam War, “you could get a deferment from the draft if you were in graduate school. I took advantage of this, as did many of my generation. It was a good decision. But this encouraged New Left radicals to stay on campus. They earned their PhD’s. The PhD glut hid in 1969, but new left activists were well represented in that group of employable professorial talent. They were able to get into positions, although untenured, in universities. They used that leverage against the Establishment.”
11. David Watson.  His books.
12. Rapture Fever, Gary North.
13. The American Vision, Gary DeMar.
14. Rousas John Rushdoony.
15. David Chilton is a writer of finance.
16. Is The World Running Down? Crisis in the Christian Worldview, Gary North.
17. Dr. Gary North on the Bible and Economics.
18. The Defense of the FaithCornelius Van Til.  This work claims that Natural Law, which Catholicism defends, is a compromise with Greek humanism.  Dr. North, who studied under Van Til at Westminster, explains “I have been studying Western social theory since 1960.  I understand it.  I just don’t accept its humanistic underpinnings.”  He even wrote a book, a few in fact, about Westminster abandoning the teaching of Van Til.
19. Sermons on Deuteronomy, John Calvin.  Yes, that John Calvin.
20. Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin.
21. The English Civil War, 1642-1649.
22. The Westminster Confessions of Faith, 1648/1648.
23. Hierarchy and Dominion, Gary North.
24. Thomas Molnar.
25. Crossed Fingers, Gary North
This plan is repeatable. It has been used by liberals to take over every mainline American denomination in the twentieth century, including the Roman Catholic Church, which succumbed in 1966. No hierarchical denomination is immune. But because so few Christians are aware of the plan’s features, and what its telltale signs are, defenses against it are weak or nonexistent. Because of this, it keeps working. So far, only conservative Missouri Synod Lutherans have self-consciously held it in check. Only the Southern Baptist Convention has reversed it.Crossed Fingers is the first book to identify and discuss in detail the five points of liberalism and the rival theological positions. It is also the first published book that “follows the money” by tracing the sources of the funding of theological liberalism in twentieth-century America. One man, more than any other, was the primary source: John D. Rockefeller, Jr.Crossed Fingers serves as a handbook for the diagnosis and defeat of the same liberal forces that have captured American Christianity. How did they do it? With a vision, with a plan, and with other people’s money. Crossed Fingers shows how they achieved victory in what had been the most theologically conservative large Protestant denomination on earth. It also shows what the conservative Presbyterians could have done, and still have not done, to immunize the Church.
26. Sacred Then and Sacred Now: The Return of the Old Latin Mass, Thomas Woods, 2008.
27. The Church Confronts Modernity: Catholic Intellectuals and the Progressive Era (Religion and American Culture), Thomas Woods, 2006.
28. The Church and the Market: A Catholic Defense of the Free Economy (Studies in Ethics and Economics), Thomas Woods, 2005.
29. How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization, Thomas Woods, 2005.
30. Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, Thomas Woods, 2011.
31. Theonomy: An Informed Response, Dr. Gary North, 1991.
Theonomy: A Reformed Critique, by William S. Barker,  reveals a startling decline of theological scholarship at Calvinism’s premier academic seminary. This decline accompanied a quarter century of institutional drift. The seminary has still not recovered from the ideological and theological disruptions of the late 1960’s. By the time the Vietnam War ended in 1975, Cornelius Van Til had retired, and the seminary no longer spoke with a unified voice, or spoke much at all, for that matter.
Theonomy:A Reformed Critique is the seminary’s theological self-justification for not having presented a systematic challenge to the humanist order in this generation. It is a defense of pietism’s thesis: a forthright rejection of the Bible’s judicial relevance in a morally disintegrating secular world. This is why Zondervan was willing to publish it. Biblical law is an offense.Theonomy: An Informed Response is a mopping-up operation. It completes what Gary North began in Westminster’s Confession: the Abandonment of Van Til’s Legacy and Greg L. Bahnsen extended in No Other Standard: Theonomy and Its Critics. The authors challenge the Westminster’s faculty’s assertion that biblical civil law is no longer binding in the New Covenant era, especially its mandated negative civil sanctions against convicted criminals. The authors ask the faculty: What does the Bible require of civil government if a resurrected Old Covenant law-order is not applicable? What is the Bible-sanctioned alternative? In short, “If not God’s law, then whose?” Westminster needs to answer.
32. Interesting commentary on committing to meaningless work from a Christian perspective by R. J. Rushdoony.  From his Revolt Against Maturity, 1977.
33. The Five Books of Moses, Oswald T. Allis, 2001.
34. The Old Testaments: Its Claims and Its Critics, Oswald T. Allis, 1972.
35. Disobedience and Defeat, Gary North, 2012.
36. Theonomy in Christian Ethics, Greg L Bahnsen, 2002,is a long exposition of Matt. 5:17-20.
37. By This Standard, Greg L. Bahnsen, 1991.
God’s law is Christianity’s tool of dominion. This is where any discussion of God’s law ultimately arrives: the issue of dominion. Ask yourself: Who is to rule on earth, Christ or Satan? Whose followers have the ethically acceptable tool of dominion, Christ’s or Satan’s? What it this tool of dominion, the biblically revealed law of God, or the law of self-proclaimed autonomous man? Whose word is sovereign, God’s or man’s?Millions of Christians, sadly, have not recognized the continuing authority of God’s law or its many applications to modern society. They have thereby reaped the whirlwind: cultural and intellectual impotence. They have surrendered this world to the devil. They have implicitly denied the power of the death and resurrection of Christ.They have served as footstools of the enemies of God. But humanism’s free ride is coming to an end. This book serves as an introduction to his woefully neglected topic.
38. Tools of Dominion: The Case Laws of Exodus, Gary North, 1990.
39. That You May Prosper, Ray Sutton, 1992.
There is a good reason for this: in the history of Christianity there has never been a theologian who has explained to anyone’s satisfaction just what the Biblical covenant is. We have heard about “covenant theology”since Calvin’s day, but can anyone tell us just what Calvin said the covenant is, how it works, and what common features are found in every Biblical covenant? Can anyone describe just exactly what the seventeenth-century Puritans had in mind when they used the word? They couldn’t?Have you read anywhere that the covenant is an inescapable concept, that it is never a question of “covenant vs. no covenant,” that it is always a question of whose covenant? Has anyone explained how all societies have imitated the Bible’s covenant model, or how Satan has adapted a crude imitation of the Biblical covenant?Until Ray Sutton cracked the code of the Bible’s covenant structure in late 1985, no one had gone into print with a clear, Biblically verifiable model of the covenant – or if anyone did, no trace of his work has survived. Covenant theologians have never adopted it.
40.  Christianity and War and Other Essays Against the Warfare State, Laurence Vance, 2008.  Tom Woods reviews this book here.
For an understanding of the Christian just war theory and retribution and restitution, this term, lex talion, should be understood as thoroughly as possible.
41.  Christian Economic Theory: Neither Aristotle Nor Kant, Gary North, Jan. 15, 2015.
42.  Covenantal Economics, Gary North, 2015.
43.  In the Shadow of Plenty: The Biblical Blueprint for Welfare, George Grant, 1986.
44.  Bringing in the Sheaves: Transforming Poverty Into Productivity, George Grant, 1985.
45.  Authority and Dominion, Part III, Gary North, 2012.
46.  Unholy Spirits: Occultism and New Age Humanism, Gary North, 1994.
1965 we see a revival of visible occultism, starting with the counter-culture destroying “the Old Establishment humanism of the “can-do” pragmatism which was apotheosized posthumously as Kennedy’s Camelot” says Gary North.  This revival of occultism marks the end of an older rationalist civilization and points to the establishment of a new one: a conscious Christian civilization which is dominion-oriented.  The only other possible contenders are Communism, which is the power religion of our era, and which is utterly bureaucratic, parasitic, and destructive, or New Age humanism, the major escapist religion, which is compromised by occultism and the theology of occultism.  Neither can lead to a new civilization. The counter-culture of 1965 really does represent a civilizing break from the previous 300 years of Western Civilization.
47.  Christian Reconstruction: What It Is, What It Isn’t, Gary North and Gary DeMar, 1991.
48.  Gary North and Cultural Underground.
49.  The Jesuits, 1988, Malachi Martin.50.  The Puritan Gift: Reclaiming the American Dream Among Global Financial Chaos, Ken Hopper and Will Hopper, 2009.
50.  Perspectives on Tithing, Gary North, et al., 2011.
51.  The Building of Christendom, 324-1100, Warren H. Carroll, 1987.  The Nicean Creed was written to address  the Arian Heresy.

Nicaea_icon
Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine, accompanied by the bishops of the First Council of Nicaea (325), holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

52.  The Theology of Christian Resistance, Gary North, 1983.
53.  The Unholy Alliance, C. Gregg Singer, 1975.
54.  He Gave Us Stories: The Bible Student’s Guide to Interpreting Old Testament Narratives, Richard L. Pratt, Jr., 1993.
55.  Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, John Foxe, 2009.
56.  Moses the Economist, C. F. Parker, 1947.
57.  Covenant Theology: From Adam to Christ, Nehemiah Coxe, 2015.
58.  Baptism in the Early Church: History, Theology, & Liturgy in the First Five Centuries, Everett Ferguson, 2009.
59.  “By Oath Consigned,” Meredith G. Kline, 1968.
60.  Mitre and Sceptre: Transatlantic Faiths, Ideas, Personalities, and Politics, Carl Bridenbaugh, 1962.  From Gary North’s Conspiracy in Philadelphia: There had been institutional opposition to the final ecclesiastical authority of the king ever since the English Civil War broke out in 1642. The American Revolution was an extension of that revolution, in both church and state. But the official language of the justifying documents of America’s revolutionaries was confined to civil government. No one in authority on either side of the war focused on the theological-ecclesiastical issue of delegated sovereignty, i.e., society-wide institutional authority under God. This moved the American Revolution from what might have been a comprehensive revolt against the king’s ecclesiastical authority and also the divine political right of Parliament to a revolt against the divine right of Parliament in the name of a rejection of the authority of the king. But in whose name was this revolt launched? By what legitimate authority? The formal answer came retroactively in 1788: We the People. This was a new god with a new sovereignty.
61.  Substracting Christianity, Joseph Sobran, 1999.
62.  Victim’s Rights, Gary North, 1990.
63.  He Shall Have Dominion: A Postmillennial Eschatology, Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr., 1997.
64.  The Greatness of the Great Commission: The Christian Enterprise in a Fallen World, Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr., 1990.
65.  By What Standard? R. J. Rushdoony, 1959 [Van Til’s pre-suppositional apologetic method]
66.  The Millenium, Loraine Boettner, 1958.  traditional postmillennialism.
67.  This Independent Republic, Rousas John Rushdoony, 1964.
68.  The Nature of the American System, R. J. Rushdoony, 1965
69.  How to Become a Millionaire in Christian Education, Ellsworth E. McIntyre, 2013, “influenced opinions in Christian Reconstructuon on an [important] scale.”
70.  Contagious Disciple Making Leading Others on a Journey of Discovery, David Watson, 2014.
71.  Systematic Theoloy: An Introduction to Christian Belief, John M. Frame, 2013.
72.  Abraham Kuyper (see his books on Amazon) was

a Dutch journalist, statesman and Neo-Calvinisttheologian. He was a master organiser. He founded a new church (the Gereformeerde Kerken), a newspaper, the Free University of Amsterdam, and the Anti-Revolutionary Party. He served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands between 1901 and 1905. In religious affairs, he sought to adapt the Dutch Reformed Church to the challenges posed by the loss of state financial aid and by religious pluralism, rising nationalism, and the Arminian religious revivals of his day which denied predestination.[1] He vigorously denounced modernism in theology as a fad that would pass away. In politics, he dominated the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) from its founding 1879 to his death in 1920. He promoted pillarisation, the social expression of the anti-thesis in public life, whereby Protestant, Catholic and secular elements each had their own independent schools, universities and social organisations.

73.  Family and Civilization, Carle C. Zimmerman, 2008.
74.  Paradise Restored: A Biblical Theology of Dominion, David Chilton, 2007.  Free version from Gary North.
75.  Van Til’s Apologetic, Greg Bahnsen, 1998.
76.  Less Than Conquerors: Evangelical Quest for Power in the Early 20th Century, Douglas Frank, 2009.
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R. J. Rushdoony. He did not begin his weekly lectures on biblical law until 1966; these became The Institutes of Biblical Law in 1973.

I had already begun applying biblical law to economics, but economics is only one small segment of society. Something much broader was necessary. In 1967, we did not yet have it.

What we (he and I; there was no one else doing any writing) did have in 1967 was Van Til’s presuppositional apologetic method, outlined in Rushdoony’s By What Standard?, traditional postmillennialism (but no writings, other than Boettner’s 1958 book, The Millennium), and the traditional Calvinist doctrine of predestination. We also had Rushdoony’s two books of somewhat related essays on American history (This Independent Republic and The Nature of the American System), his book of essays on the founders of American progressive education (The Messianic Character of American Education), his short book on education, Intellectual Schizophrenia, and his mini-book, Freud (which I still regard as the best single piece of scholarly writing he ever produced). Craig Press had not yet published The Mythology of Science, which came later that year. What we had, in short, was a series of essays critical of what has come to be R. J. Rushdoony. He did not begin his weekly lectures on biblical law until 1966; these became The Institutes of Biblical Law in 1973.

I had already begun applying biblical law to economics, but economics is only one small segment of society. Something much broader was necessary. In 1967, we did not yet have it.

What we (he and I; there was no one else doing any writing) did have in 1967 was Van Til’s presuppositional apologetic method, outlined in Rushdoony’s By What Standard?, traditional postmillennialism (but no writings, other than Boettner’s 1958 book, The Millennium), and the traditional Calvinist doctrine of predestination. We also had Rushdoony’s two books of somewhat related essays on American history (This Independent Republic and The Nature of the American System), his book of essays on the founders of American progressive education (The Messianic Character of American Education), his short book on education, Intellectual Schizophrenia, and his mini-book, Freud (which I still regard as the best single piece of scholarly writing he ever produced). Craig Press had not yet published The Mythology of Science, which came later that year. What we had, in short, was a series of essays critical of what has come to be

BIBLICAL COMMENTARIES
1.  John Stott on Romans.
2.  John Murray on Romans.
3.  St. John Chrysostom’s homilies on Romans.
4.  The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrate:  A Proper Resistance to Tyranny and a Repudiation of Unlimited Obedience to Civil Government, Matt Trewhella, 2013.  America has entered troubling times. The rule of law is crumbling. The massive expansion of Federal government power with its destructive laws and policies is of grave concern to many. But what can be done to quell the abuse of power by civil authority? Are unjust or immoral actions by the government simply to be accepted and their lawless commands obeyed? How do we know when the government has acted tyrannically? Which actions constitute proper and legitimate resistance? This book places in your hands a hopeful blueprint for freedom. Appealing to history and the Word of God, Pastor Matthew Trewhella answers these questions and shows how Americans can successfully resist the Federal government’s attempts to trample our Constitution, assault our liberty, and impugn the law of God. The doctrine of the lesser magistrates declares that when the superior or higher civil authority makes an unjust/immoral law or decree, the lesser or lower ranking civil authority has both the right and duty to refuse obedience to that superior authority. If necessary, the lower authority may even actively resist the superior authority. Historically, this doctrine was practiced before the time of Christ and Christianity. It was Christian men, however, who formalized and embedded it into their political institutions throughout Western Civilization.
5.  Gary North devotes Chapter 13 to Romans here.
6.
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8.
9.
10.

CIA
1.  Spy Secrets That Can Save Your Life: A Former CIA Officer Reveals Safety and Survival Techniques to Keep You and Your Family Protected, Jason Hansen, 2015.
2.  The Old Boys: The American Elite and the Origins of the CIA, Burton Hersh, 2001.
3.  The Devil’s Chessboard: Allen Dulles, the CIA, and the Rise of the Secret Government, David Talbot, 2015.
4.  Doug Valentine is a must-read.
5.  F. William Engdahl is another must-read.  His recent comments on Trump as backdoor man for Kissinger is pretty good.
6.  The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War, Stephen Kinzer, 2014.
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14.
15.

CIVIL RIGHTS, AMERICAN VERSION
1.  List of Notes:  An Eclectic Collection Deserving of a Wider Audience, Shaun Usher, 2015.
2.  Lots of book references in these articles on the Civil Rights.  Be sure to check out Gail Jarvis.  He’s excellent.
3.  Also see these at Mises.
4.  Though this is behind a paywall, you will be greatly rewarded for your time and money here by learning from a master historian, Dr. Gary North.
5.  The US Commission on Civil Rights, led by Martin Castro, published a report in September that stated civil rights, as determined by the government, are more important than religious rights. This 300 page report is the direction that progressives are taking in our court system. Christians can believe whatever they want to in their head, but their behavior cannot violate others civil rights.

William McGurn of the Wall Street Journal confirms that Hillary and Obama agree with Mr. Castro.

I see persecution coming for Christians because progressives want to do away with religious freedom. If Hillary is elected, the judges in the circuit courts can rule in favor of LGBT rights, despite a Republican Congress. Looks scary to me…

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10.

11.

CIVIL WAR, U.S.
1.  Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War, Jeffrey Rogers Hummel.  Why did the South secede, and why did the North prevent them?  “Union” was sold as “Freedom.”

Lincoln’s Emancipation Proc. framed as a wartime measure to justify it, and did afford a large number of blacks as recruits to the Northern army.  Slaves grew in number AFTER the U.S. Constitution.  Even without the Constitution, slaves would have increased in number.  reproduced itself through natural increase, rather than through additional captures.  Am. Revolution sparked the first emancipation feelings, most significantly felt in the northern states.  High rates of manumission in Virginia.  By the time their constitution was adopted, there was a cooling of emancipation–S. Carolina, Georgia, etc.

Upper South, particularly Virginia, wanted to maintain the  value of their slaves so they could sell them to the South.

Lincoln got the war started.  As a republican he was not committed to the abolition of slavery, but only to limiting the number of slave states.  1860 in a 4-way race.  In the north, Lincoln run against Douglas.  In the south, southern democrats running against the rump whig party.  In the deep south, lincoln didn’t win a single state.  Why didn’t Lincoln didn’t get the votes in the Deep South.  Southern slave holders dominated the state and national governments.  Republicans referred to it as the Slave Power, a powerful special interest.  Supreme Court Justices owned slaves.  Presidents owned slaves.

National gov’t hostile to slavery.  Rebuild republican party in slave states, like Missouri.  Lincoln hadn’t advocated it, but there were more radical members in his cabinet.  A long-term decline of slavery.  Needed protection of the federal gov’t to preserve slavery.

Once Lincoln calls out troops, that solidified the South.  Once he announces troops to keep states in the unions, slave holders become more unified against the union.

Ending slavery was an unintended consequence of the civil war.  Reason the North fought the civil war was to keep the union, not to end slavery.  The North suppressed Southern secession was because they wanted to maintain the union and not to stop slavery.  The ending of slavery was an unintended consequence of the war.  Ending slavery was unintended in the beginning.

Why did the support of the union in the North gain momentum.

Southerners were concerned about tariff advantages for the North.

primary factor was ideological, identifying union with liberty.  Lincoln’s phrase “last and best hope of the world.”  Splitting of US would be perceived as a failure of democracy for the rest of the world.  Southerners weren’t playing by the rules, and Lincoln said that permitting secession is an argument for anarchy.

Peaceful secession might have hastened slavery.

Lincoln’s gov’t was subsidizing slavery.  It has to have the power of gov’t behind it.  Fugitive Slave Law.  Achilles heel of slavery is the runaway.  Diminishes the value of the slave and the slave system.  Threat to the maintenance of the slave system.  Slave patrols.  Nat’l gov’t, it was the Fugitive Slave Law.  If Northerners had been interested in ending slavery, there were a set of policies that they could have implemented, like repealing the Fugitive Slave Law.  Slaver was economical moribund?  Not true.  As long as slavery had gov’t support, then . . . .  Slavery provided large economic rewards.  Slavery had been declining in the border states prior to the civil war.  95% of slaves in Delaware prior to Lincoln had been freed.  50% of the Maryland slaves had been freed prior to Lincoln.

Most radical abolitionist was William Lloyd Garrison, advocated immediate compensated emancipation.  Radical wedge of the much broader anti-slavery movement.  Garrison called for Northern secession.  Mainstream historians have a hard time dealing with Garrison’s position.  Frederick Douglas also held this position.  A moral perfectionism . . . ?  Never fully popular in the North.  Northerners wanted anti-slavery AND disunion.  Can’t have both.  When S. Carolina secedes, Garrison believe that they’re bluffing.  Once under way, Garrison and other radical abolitionists saw the war as a way of bringing an end to slavery.  Garrison, part of a small minority, was almost lynched in Boston by a mob.

The one prominent abolitionist who remained an anti-war abolitionist was Lysander Spooner.

Call for the kidnapping of  Governor . . . big debates was whether the Constitution was pro-slavery or anti-slavery.  Garrison took the position that the Constitution  with its Fugitive Slave Law was a pro-slavery document.  John Brown’s raid to facilitate a slave revolt.  Spooner had a plan to hold the governor of Virginia hostage in ransom for John Brown’s life.

After the war, Spooner says that the

American indians were less desirable than black slaves because indians could run away.  slaves were major assets.  S. Carolina is hiring local indian tribes where they’ selling to west indies to pay for the importation of black slaves.  west indies slaves difficult to run way–islands.

Title comes from LIncoln quote.

The war resulted in an expansion of gov’t in the north and the south–increased taxation, conscription, repeal of civil liberties, that make war the health of the states.  After the war, there’s the post-war ratchet effect.  Gov’t invention.  Civil War was the great watershed of gov’t expansion.  The long-term trend for gov’t power to recede, restrained, limited, and less intrusive.  The civil war reverses this trend.  The long-run trend starts going in the opposite direction.

How much of this do we blame on lincoln versus the other 3 that ran against him?  Mystical identification of liberty with union.  Breckenridge, southern democrat who went with the confederacy.  South isn’t going to secede

National gov’t did not have the authority to prevent secession.  Buchannan would not have been able to prevent the Civil War either.

Bogus jobs created to prevent conscription.

Robert Wenzel of EconomicPolicyJournal interviews Jeffrey Rogers Hummel, author of the book Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War.  Wenzel guides a great interview. Looking forward to reading Hummel’s book.

1.  War Crimes Against Southern Civilians, Walter Cisco, 2007.
2.  A Disease in the Public Mind: A New Understanding of Why We Fought the Civil War, Thomas Fleming, 2013.
3.  “Who Caused the Bloodbath of 1861-1865?”Thomas Di Lorenzo.
4.  Clyde Wilson books.
5.  The South in American Literature, 1607-1900, Jay B. Hubbell, 1954.
6.  When in the Course of Human Events: Arguing the Case for Southern Secession, Charles Adams, 2000.  Here is a review of the book by Richard Ebling.
7.  Civil War Volumes, 1-3 Box Set, Shelby Foote, 1986.
8.  The Unvanquished: The Corrected Text, William Faulkner, 1991.
9.  YOU WILL LOVE THESE SOUTHERN SONGS by Bobby Horton.  These songs show a glorious love for country and the preference and cherished love for liberty.  These songs also give you a great sense of community, love for its history, and a longing to preserve it.
10. North Against South: The American Illiad, 1848-1877, Ludwell H. Johnson, 2003.  Recommended for its critique of “Reconstruction.”
“No period of Southern history has been covered by more distortions in recent times than has 1865-1876.  Not too long ago, nearly everybody, including Northerners, regarded this period as a shameful un-American exercise in military rule and limitless corruption.  Now, it is established academic “truth” that the only thing wrong with Reconstruction was that it was not ruthless enough.  The South should have been subjected to a complete Marxis, egalitarian revolution.”  Clyde Wilson.
11.  Deconstruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Late War (Southern Classic Series), 1998, Richard Taylor.
12.  The Real Lincoln:
Edgar Allan Poe, the South’s  greatest 19th century writer, despised New Englanders, their pretensions, and their baneful influence on American culture.  In his collected essays and criticism, which can be found in many libraries, take a look at his “Boston and the Bostonians,” “Brook Farm,” and “The Literati of New York City.”  If you want to know what the people who settled Boston were really like, watch Vincent Price’s Puritan Witch Hunter in the film “The Conqueror Worm,” originally titled “The Witchfinder General,” [can be found here] is based on a Poe story.
13.  The Education of Little Tree, Forrest Carter, 1976.
“Then there is the saga of the Alabama writer Forrest Carter, friend and supporter of Governor George Wallace, who wrote the book Gone to Texas upon which Clint Eastwood’s The Outlaw Josey Wales was based. Carter also wrote The Education of Little Tree, about the sufferings of an Indian boy at the hands of puritanical authorities. The book was reprinted by the devotedly multicultural University of New Mexico Press and became celebrated in Native American studies. Any reader other than an American intellectual could see right away that the book is really about the persecution of Southerners by Yankees. Imagine the consternation when Carter’s background was revealed! (The movie version became anti-Southern, of course.”  Yankees are the intellectual class.
14.  The Burning: Sheridan’s Devastation of the Shenandoah,  John L. Heatwole, 1998.
15.  War Crimes Against Southern Civilians, Walter Brian Cisco, 2007.
16.  “The Cause of the Civil War: Historian, Thomas Fleming, Discovers the Yankee Problem in America,” Thomas Di Lorenzo.
17.  Robert Lewis Dabneywas a Southern Presbyterian minister and biographer of General Stonewall Jackson.
18.  The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties, Mark E. Neely, Jr., 1992.
19. Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America, Allen C. Guelzo, 2006.
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COLLECTIVISM
From Wikipeida, “Historically, the term was a colloquialism used in the early-to-mid 20th century by Communists and Socialists in political debates, referring pejoratively to the Communist ‘party line’, which provided for “correct” positions on many matters of politics. The term was adopted in the later 20th century by the New Left, applied with a certain humor to condemn sexist or racist conduct as ‘not politically correct’. By the early 1990s, the term was adopted by US conservatives as a pejorative term for all manner of attempts to promote multiculturalism and identity politics, particularly, attempts to introduce new terms that sought to leave behind discriminatory baggage ostensibly attached to older ones, and conversely, to try to make older ones taboo.”

1.  One is a Crowd: Reflections of an Individualist, Frank Chodorov.
2.  Out of Step: Autobiography of an Individualist, Frank Chodorov.
3.  Collectivism on the Campus: The Battle for the Mind in American Colleges, E. Merrill Root.
4.  40 Alternatives to College, James Altucher.
5.  “Great Books and Great Snippets,” The Cult of Individuality, Robert Nisbet, 1971.
6.  Egalitarian Envy: The Political Foundations of Social Justice, Gonzalo Fernandez de la Mora, 2000.
7.  Freedom, Inequality, Primitivism, & the Division of Labor, Murray Rothbard, 1970.  Here is an introduction to that essay.
8.  Successful Investing in an Age of Envy, Gary North, 1983.

DO THESE:
A Letter to 20 Year Olds From James Altucher:

If you want to make money you have to learn the following skills. None of these skills are taught in college.

I’m not saying college is awful or about money, etc. I’m just saying that the only skills needed to make money will never be learned in college:

1. How to sell (both in a presentation and via copy writing).
2. How to negotiate (which means win-win, not war).
3. Creativity (take out a pad, write down a list of ideas, every day).
4. Leadership (give more to others than you expect back for yourself).
5. Networking (a corollary of leadership).
6. How to live by themes instead of goals (goals will break your heart).
7. Reinvention (which will happen repeatedly throughout a life).
8. Idea sex (get good at coming up with ideas. Then combine them. Master the intersection).
9. The 1% rule (every week try to get better 1% physically, emotionally, mentally).
10. “The google rule” – always send people to the best resource, even if it’s a competitor. The benefit to you comes back tenfold.
11. Give constantly to the people in your network. The value of your network increase linearly if you get to know more people but EXPONENTIALLY if the people you know get to know and help each other.
12. How to fail so that a failure turns into a beginning.
13. Simple tools to increase productivity.
14. How to master a field. You can’t learn this in school with each “field” being regimented into equal 50 minute periods. Mastery begins when formal education ends. Find the topic that sets your heart on fire. Then combust.
15. Stopping the noise: news, advice books, fees upon fees in almost every area of life. Create your own noise instead of falling in life with the others.

If you do all this you will gradually make more and more money and help more and more people. At least, I’ve seen it happen for me and for others.
I hope this doesn’t sound arrogant. I’ve messed up too much by not following the above advice. Don’t plagiarize the lives of your parents, your peers, your teachers, your colleagues, your bosses. Create your own life. Be the criminal of their rules. I wish I were you because if you follow the above, then you will most likely end up doing what you love and getting massively rich and helping many others. I didn’t do that when I was 20. But now, at 46, I’m really grateful I have the chance every day to wake up and improve 1%.

COLLEGE CAMPUS CULTURE
1. Rape Culture Culture Hysteia: Fixing the Damage Done to Men and Women, Wendy McElroy, 2016.
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COMMUNISM
1. Cleon Skousen, The Naked Communist.
The Naked Communist is a 1958 book by an ex FBI agentconservative United States author and faith-based political theorist Cleon Skousen.[1]
2. Beating the Unbeatable Foe: One Man’s Victory Over Communism, Leviathan, and the Last Enemy, Fred Schwarz.
3. Marx’s Religion of Revolution: Regeneration Through Chaos, Gary North.
4. Dedication and Leadership, Douglas Hyde.
Someone else had known: Douglas Hyde. He had been a major figure in Great Britain’s Communist Party in the 1930s and 1940s. He converted to Catholicism in the late 1940s. He wrote a classic account of his years in the Party: Dedication and Leadership, which Notre Dame University Press published in 1956, the year that I heard Schwarz’s lecture.

In the mid-1980s, I was given a copy of his limited-printing book, Dedication and Leadership Techniques (1962). I wanted to publish it. I wrote him for permission. He said no. Why? Because the Communist Party no longer resembled the dedicated Party of his youth. He said that the book would give a false opinion of the Party as of 1985.

I publish a modified version of it on this site. You should read it — not for what it says about Communism today — or in 1985 — but in earlier generations.
http://www.garynorth.com/members/programs/fileinfo.cfm?id=28&action=display
5. Egalitarian Envy: The Political Foundations of Social Justice, Gonzalo Fernandez de la Mora.
Gary North explains that “One of the most curious of the suppressed manuscripts that I personally have seen is the four-volume typewritten book by Margaret Patricia McCarran, which she titled “The Fabian Transmission Belt.” She was the daughter of Sen. Pat McCarran, who was the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and also of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee in the early 1950’s.

Because she had access to all of her father’s papers and files, she was able to survey the development of Fabian socialism as no other Americans conservative ever had. She was a serious student. Her Ph.D. dissertation was Fabianism in the Political Life of Britain, 1919-1931 (1954). It is available as a PDF document from the Mises Institute. For anybody who is serious about understanding the Fabian movement, this is the book to begin your detailed study.

Her Ph.D. dissertation was the tip of the iceberg in her research. She went on to document the development of the Fabian movement in the United States as well as Great Britain. She provided the extracts from primary source documents. She offered footnotes.

She wrote “The Fabian Transmission Belt” in four volumes on legal size paper. She had them bound. I don’t know how many sets she produced, but I know where one set is. I saw it in 1964, and at one stage I began reading it. My father-in-law. R. J. Rushdoony, had a copy, which she had given to him. He had great respect for her, although he disagreed with her adulation of John F. Kennedy.

It was around 1964 that her superiors in the Catholic Church found out about the manuscript. She was a nun. Her bishop intervened and demanded that she return all copies of the manuscript to him. She had already given a copy to my father-in-law, and the bishop never got his hands on it. He confiscated the ones she had. Where those copies exist, I don’t know. Maybe they were burned. But the hierarchy did their best to see that this manuscript never saw the light of day.”
6.  Mao’s Great Famine: The History of China’s Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-1962, Frank Dikotter, 2011.
7.  The Great Terror: A Reassessment, Robert Conquest, 2007.
8.  Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror Famine, Robert Conquest, 1987.
9.  Stalin: Breaker of Nations, Robert Conquest, 1992
10.  The Gulag Archipelago, Alexandr Solzhenitsyn, 2007.
11.  Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression, Jean-Louis Panné (Author), Andrzej Paczkowski (Author), Karel Bartosek (Author), Jean-Louis Margolin (Author), Nicolas Werth (Author), Stéphane Courtois (Author), Mark Kramer (Editor, Translator), Jonathan Murphy (Translator), 1999.
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CONSERVATISM
1. The Political Economy of Liberal Corporatism, Joseph R. Stromberg
2. The Rockefeller File, Gary Allen.
3. The Triumph of Conservatism, Gabriel Kolko.
4. Left & Right: The Prospect of Liberty, Murray Rothbard.
5. The Ruling Class, Angelo Codevilla.
6. Political Polytheism: The Myth of Pluralism, Gary North.
“God-fearing Christian Americans have been told that the Constitution teaches the absolute separation of Church and State. They have been told correctly. But what they have not been told is precisely where it says this. It does not say this in the First amendment. The First amendment says only that Congress shall make no law regarding religion or the free exercise thereof. So, where does the Constitution prohibit a Christian America? In a section that has been ignored by scholars for so long that it is virtually never discussed-the key provision that transformed American into a secular humanist nation. But it took 173 years to do this: from 1788 until 1961.”
7. Conservatism: A Phony Movement?
Charles Burris explains: “What most Americans mistakenly regard today as the “Conservative movement” has undergone many convoluted and dramatic transformations over the past sixty years. Perhaps the most keen observer has been Murray N. Rothbard, the internationally acclaimed economist and historian. How this disinformation process began is detailed in three insightful articles, “Life in the Old Right,” “The Foreign Policy of the OldRight,” and “The Transformation of the American Right,” available online. However, Rothbard’s long-awaited book, The Betrayal of the American Right, tells the full story of how this subversive movement at war with American liberties and the rule of law, came about. “Conservatism,” since the days of Burke and Robespierre, has stood for the status quo and an apologia for tyranny.”
8.  A Choice, Not an Echo, Phyllis Schlafly, 1964.
9.  The Conscience of a Conservative, Barry Goldwater, 1960.
10.  The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot, Russell Kirk, 2001.
11.  Why Hayek Is a Conservative, Bloom
12.  Russell Kirk: American Conservative, Bradley Birzer, 2015.  Birzer is the co-founder of the Imaginative Conservative.  He’s written a number of books, The American Cicero: The Life of Charles Carroll (Lives of the Founding Fathers, 2010, and others.
13.  J. R. R. Tolkien, Sanctifying Myth: Understanding Middle Earth, Bradley Birzer, 2014.
14.  With No Apologies, Barry Goldwater, 1955.
15.  The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945, George H. Nash, 1976.
16.  Statecraft As Soulcraft: What Government Does, George F. Will, 1983.  Creepy.
17.  by Charles Burris, Sunday, June 4, 2017.

While over many decades there have been innumerable volumes published on Conservatism, tracing its earliest origins, multifaceted ideological character and ever-shifting beliefs over time, two sets of books have proven indispensable in helping me to understand and define its essence and make-up. Most of this important material is unknown to contemporary individuals who self-label themselves as “Conservative,” and identify with such persons as O’Reilly, Hannity, Coulter, Levin, Limbaugh, Savage, or other media talking heads. They are “reactionaries” in the truest sense. for their shallow, ahistorical conception of what it means to be a “Conservative” is more a gut-level reaction or emotive response to the imbecilities of the Left rather than a carefully thought out set of principles.

Many would no doubt assert that Russell Kirk is the uncle of that Star Trek guy.

But the two sets of in-depth, scholarly books presented here address these gaping deficiencies: Peter Witonski, The Wisdom of Conservatism (four volumes); and W. H. Greenleaf’s magisterial three volume set on The British Political Tradition: Volume One: The Rise of Collectivism; Volume Two: The Ideological Heritage; and Volume Three: A Much Governed Nation. Greenleaf’s series is especially useful and intellectually intriguing because he explicitly characterizes the long-range ideological struggle as one between libertarianism versus collectivism.
18.
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CONSPIRACIES
1.  Elites in American History: The Federalist Years to the Civil War, Philip H. Burch, Jr., 1981
2.  October Surprise, Barbara Honegger, 1989.
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8.

CONSTITUTION
1. The Secret Constitution and the Need for Constitutional Change, Professor Arthur S. Miller.
2. John Hancock’s Big Toe and the Constitution, Gary North.
3. The Revolution Was, Garet Garrett.
4. No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority, Lysander Spooner.
5. Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention, May-September, 1787, Catherine Drinker Bowen.
6. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution, Kevin R. C. Gutzman.  Claims that the Constitution is a dead letter?
7. Democracy: The God That Failed, Hans Hermann-Hoppe.
8. Financial Reckoning Day: Surviving the Soft Depression of the 21st Century, Bill Bonner.  Makes a brief case for monarchy over democracy.
9. The Constitution as Covenant.  Adam broke the covenant. Christ re-established it. This is the central theme of all Calvinism. This is why it is called covenant theology. It was the theology that underlay all of the American colonies. Its secularization led to the Constitution. This is well known among secular historians, and has been for 70 years. The historical literature on this is immense.

Almost 30 years ago, Professor Arthur S. Miller wrote a book: The Secret Constitution and the Need for Constitutional Change (Greenwood, 1987). This book received little attention at the time, and it is very difficult to locate today. Miller argued that there are essentially two constitutions. One of them is the one we all know about, the one we are required to study, or at least used to be required to study, in high school civics classes. It is the one for show. The other Constitution is the operational Constitution, as enforced by the courts and by federal bureaucracies. It is a completely separate Constitution. It favors the ruling class, which is the group described above.

The first people to warn about this were the anti-Federalists. They understood it in 1787. Patrick Henry understood it. Sam Adams understood it. Adams was persuaded to withdraw his criticisms by the promise made by Madison of the first 10 amendments, which we call the Bill of Rights. But the Bill of Rights came under assault as soon as the Constitution was ratified. Alexander Hamilton began the great centralization of the federal government. He used the now-familiar dual tactic of expanding federal debt and creating a central bank owned by private investors. He got both of these into operation in 1791.

The only significant 19th-century rollbacks in power took place under Andrew Jackson’s presidency: his veto of the bill that would have extended the charter of the Second Bank of the United States beyond 1836, and his one-year reduction of the United States government’s debt to zero. That never happened again. The only other major rollback was the 21st amendment in 1933, which was the repeal of Prohibition. The broad sweep of American constitutional history has been one story, namely, the expansion of federal power at the expense of individual liberties.
10.  New Nation: A History of the United States During the Confederation, 1781-1789, Merrill Jensen, 1966.
11.  Liberty, Order, & Justice: An Introduction to the Constitutional Principles of American Government, James McClellan, 2000.
12.  An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United StatesCharles A. Beard.

The Foreward in Dr. North’s Conspiracy in Philadelphia ends this way:

Modern man believes that he can safely avoid identifying the God of the Bible as the incorporating agent. Modern man identifies, either explicitly or implicitly, other gods of incorporation: Man, the People, the Volk, or the Proletariat. Each of these gods has his day in the sun. But the sun eventually sets.

The thirteen colonies in 1775 had charters or constitutions. Only Rhode Island’s charter allowed men of no trinitarian confession to be elected to civil office, i.e., to serve as part of the voice of civil authority. Therefore, only Rhode Island refused to identify the God of the Bible as the sovereign incorporating agent of the colony. The Articles of Confederation (1781) served as a halfway national covenant. They identified “the Great Governor of the World” as the sovereign incorporating agent (Article XIII). The United States Constitution (1788) identifies “We the People” as the sovereign incorporating agent. This book is the story of this covenantal transition: new covenant, new god.

13.  The Beginnings of National Politics: An Interpretive History of the Continental Congress, Jack N. Rakove, 1988.
14.  Recent Changes in American Constitutional Theory, John W. Burgess, 1923.  From World Cat.
15.  Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787 to 1788, Pauline Maeir, 2011. Gary North says that “It is the ONLY book on ratification based on actual documents. Everyone basically says: “She cornered the market. We give up.” You start with her book or else forget about the topic.”
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COPY WRITING
1. 87 Secrets of Outrageous Business Success, Bob Bly.
2. Dan Poynter’s Self-Publishing Manual: How to Write, Print, and Sell Your Own Book, Dan Poytner.

THE COURTS
1. Dumbing Down the Courts: How Politics Keeps the Smartest Judges Off the Bench, John R. Lott, Jr.
2. Acquittal: An Insider Reveals the Stories and Strategies Behind Today’s Most Infamous Verdicts, Richard Gabriel.
3. The Courts and the New Deal,” William Anderson, 2005.
4. Licensed to Lie, Sindey Powell, 2014.
5. The Price of Perfect Justice: The Adverse Consequences of Current Legal Doctrine on the American Courtroom, MacKlin Fleming, 1974.
6.  No Crueler Tyrannies:  Accusation, False Witness, and Other Terrors of Our Times, Dorothy Rabinowitz, 2004.  Posted here Thursday, October 22, 2015.
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CULTURE
1.  As the world watches the wrenching events in France unfold after the horrific “Charlie Hebdo” massacre, one cannot not help but be reminded of the stentorian warning to the West emblazoned in the apocalyptic novel by Jean Raspail, The Camp of the Saints (.pdf). In one of the most divisive and controversial works of the 20th Century, Raspail chillingly predicted and prophesized forty two years ago precisely what is occurring and its suicidal consequences for the diseased remnants of that civilization. It is unquestionably the most powerful novel I have ever read. Insidious egalitarianism, destructive welfarism, aggressive multiculturalism, cultural Marxism, Third World invasions by the wretched of the earth, militaristic imperialism posing as humanitarian liberation, and mindless parousiatic atheism in the name of a hallowed pluralism, have blended into a banal omnipresent doxology, that of statolatry. Other prophetic voices have followed Raspail: Oriana Fallaci, Bruce Bawer, and most notably Patrick J. Buchanan (herehere here). The culture vultures have indeed come home to roost and are flailing away at the twisted torso of the corpse that was once the West.

DEMOCRACY
1. How Democracies Perish, Jean Franyois Revel.  “An epitaph on modern democracy’s inability to defend itself against dedicated, relentless Communist totalitarianism says Dr. North.
2. Democracy–The God That Failed: The Economics and Politics of Monarchy, Democracy, and Natural Order, Hans Hermann-Hoppe.
3.  Destroying Democracy:  How Government Funds Partisan Politics, Thomas J. Di Lorenzo and James T. Bennett, 1986.  More books by Thomas J. Di Lorenzo.
4.  The Myth of the Rational Voter: Why Democracies Choose Bad Policies, Bryan Caplan, 2007.
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ECONOMIC TRENDS
1. How You Can Profit  from the Coming Devaluation, Harry Browne.

ECONOMICS
1. Economics in One LessonHenry Hazlitt, 1946.
2. Whatever Happened to Penny CandyRichard J. Maybury, 1978.
3. Mises Institute.
4. Economic Calculation in the Socialist Commonwealth, Ludwig von Mises, 1920.
5. A terrific list from Tom Woods.
6.  Armchair Economist, Steven E. Landsburg, 2012.
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ECONOMICS
1. Hormageddon: How Too Much of a Good Thing Leads to Disaster, Bill Bonner.
2. Austrian School Business Cycle Theory, Murray Rothbard, 2014.  Buy this book today!  If you want to understand economics in all countries that have a central bank, which is all of them, then you’ll need this book to learn how the machinations of the different central banks’ inflationary policies produce wild swings in prices and devalue your currency and savings.  Apparently, this book is just the first three chapters of Rothbard’s “America’s Great Depression.”  As soon as I earn more money on my job, I will buy more of these books.
3. The Ultimate Foundation of Economic Science: An Essay on Method (Liberty Fund Library of the Works of Ludwig von Mises), Ludwig von Mises, 1962.
4. Economic Calculation in the Social Commonwealth, Ludwig von Mises, 1920.
David Gordon on Murray Rothbard’s Favorite Books, 2009.
5.  An Introduction to Christian Economics, Gary North, 1973.
6.  The Clipper Ship Strategy: For Success in Your Career, Business, and Investments (An Uncle Eric Book), Richard J. Maybury & Jane A. Williams, 2003
7.  The Failure of the New Economics: An Analysis of the Keynesian Fallacies, Henry Hazlitt, 1959.
8.  The Undercover Economist, Tim Harford, 2007.
9.  The Raven of Zurich: The Memoirs of Felix Somary, Felix Somary, 1986.  Gary North writes,

Schumpeter borrowed the concept from a pair of revolutionists, Bakunin and Marx. They preached rival social philosophies that were both based on literal murder, not figurative murder. Schumpeter was impressed by their concept. Felix Somary records in his autobiography, The Raven of Zurich (1986), a discussion he had with the economist Joseph Schumpeter and the sociologist Max Weber in 1918. Weber was the most prestigious academic social scientist in the world when he died in 1920. Schumpeter expressed happiness regarding the Russian Revolution. The USSR would be a test case for socialism. Weber warned that this would cause untold misery. Schumpeter replied, “That may well be, but it would be a good laboratory.” Weber responded, “A laboratory heaped with human corpses!” Schumpeter retorted, “Every anatomy classroom is the same thing.” Weber stormed out of the room (p. 121). I don’t blame him. (I am indebted to Mark Skousen for this reference.)

10.  Economic Calculations in a Socialist Commonwealth, Ludwig von Mises, 1920.

This is the essay that overthrew the socialist paradigm in economics, and provided the foundation for modern Austrian price theory. When it first appeared in 1920, Mises was alone in challenging the socialists to explain how their pricing system would actually work in practice.

Mises proved that socialism could not work because it could not distinguish more or less valuable uses of social resources, and predicted the system would end in chaos. The result of his proof was the two-decade-long “socialist calculation” debate. This edition contains an afterword by Joseph Salerno, who applies the calculation argument to contemporary problems like environmentalism and business regulation:

11.  Principles of Economics, Carl Menger, 1890.   Gary North explains that

It was the most important book in the history of what became known as Austrian School economics. It argued that value comes from consumer demand, which is based on subjective value. It does not come from either labor time or the cost of production. . . .

That insight overturned what in retrospect became known as classical economics. Adam Smith had made a mistake in attributing value to the labor time invested in a particular consumer good. Karl Marx built a theory of revolution on that erroneous idea.

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EDUCATION
1.  Collectivism on the Campus: The Battle for the Mind in American Colleges, E. Merrill Root.
2.  The Nearly Free University and the Emerging Economy: The Revolution in Higher Education (2013), Charles Hugh Smith.
3.  John Taylor Gattoarticles.
4.  A Place Called School, John Goodlad, 2004.
5.  Crisis in the Classroom, Charles E. Silberman, 1971.
6.  Fred M. Hechinger, conservative educator, staunch supporter of public schools, points out that kids have been getting kicked out of school since the turn of the century.
7.  John Holt books.  Here is Holt’s Wikipedia page.  Modern childhood was invented for the modern world.
8.  How Children Learn (Classics in Child Development), John Holt, 2009.
9.  Teach Your Own: The John Holt Book of Homeschooling, John Holt, 2099.
10.  Learning All the Time, John Holt, 1990.
11.  How Children Fail (Classics in Child Development), John Holt, 1995.
12.  Instead of Education: Ways to Help People Do Things Better, John Holt, 2003.
13.  Escape from Childhood: The Needs and Rights of Children, John Holt, 2013.
14.  John Holt’s YouTube channel.
15.  Freedom and Beyond, John Holt, 1972.
16.  Is Public Education Necessary?Samuel L. Blumenfeld, 1985.
17.  Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families, Sheldon Richman, 1994.
18.  Marshall Fritz, chairman, founder, and former president of the Alliancefor the Separation of School and State.
The one important person I have not had the opportunity to chat with is the great John Taylor Gatto.
19.  Why Johnny Can’t Read, Rudolph Flesch, 1955.
20.  Worthless, Aaron Clarey, 2011.
21.  The best description of what government money did to higher education is Robert Nisbet’s book, The Degradation of the Academic Dogma, 1971.
22.  The Messianic Character of American Education, R.J. Rushdoony, his book of essays on the founders of American progressive education
23.  Intellectual Schizophrenia, R. J. Rushdoony [his short book on education]
24.  Lively Experiment: Shaping Christianity in America, Sidney Mead, 1963.
25.  Capitalism and Freedom, Milton Friedman, 1961.
26.  Passion Driven Education: How to Use Your Child’s Interests to Ignite a Lifelong Love in Learning, Connor Boyack, 2016.
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The above video is an interview of John Holt. What is remarkable is that I’ve posted at least 3 other video interviews of his and each one the YouTube channel pulled it. Let’s see what happens with this one. I posted this one on 12/24/2016

Thanks to Charles Burris.
Guilt, Shame, & Understanding: Understanding and Overcoming Negative Emotions, Peter Breggin, 2014.

ENERGY
1. Energy Trading and Risk Management: A Practical Approach to Hedging, Trading and Portfolio Diversification, Iris Marie Mack. Here is a brief review of her book by Guarva Sharma.
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ETHICS
1. “Nothing Exists Except People,” Stephan Molyneux.
2.  Ethics from Mises.
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THE EURO
1. The Tragedy of the Euro, Philipp Bagus.

2.  17th Century European history:  James I: The Fool as King, Otto Scott, 1976.
3.  Why Europe?  The Medieval Origins of Its Special Path, Michael Mitterauer, 2010.
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EUROPEAN HISTORY
1.  See this article, “Two Wings of the Enlightenment,” for essential books on the epoch.
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FAMILIES
1.  Taken Into Custody: The War Against Fathers, Marriage, and the Family, Stephen Baskerville, 2007.  Thanks to Will Grigg because of this article.
2.  Christianity on mandating families.  Family and Civilization, Carle C. Zimmerman, 2008.
3.  The Ultimate Resource, Julian Simons, 1983.
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FASCISM
1. Fascism: Modern & Postmodern, Gene Edward Veith, Jr., 2000.
This is one of a handful of books that is probably worth rereading once a year. Make sure you get the version with Vishal Mangalwadi’s forward.

The book shows that the central essence of fascism was hatred of God’s revealed Word in the Bible. The fascists were explicit about this, and Veith has the footnotes. Their hatred of the Jews was derived from the hatred of the Bible, because the Jews gave Western civilization the Bible. There is a footnote to Mein Kampf where Hitler said that after he took care of the Jews the real Final Solution would be to eliminate the Christians.

Veith deals with Nazis and homosexuality. In the early Nazi regime homosexuality was widespread, open and heavily promoted. Ernst Rohm, the head of the SA, was a practicing homosexual, and many of the top Nazi officers were homosexuals. Homoerotic art was common in Nazi buildings. Promotion of homosexuality was done in opposition to the Bible. The reason homosexuality fell out of favor with the Nazis was because it ran afoul of their eugenics program. This is never mentioned by mainstream channels.

Veith also deals with the continuities between postmodern philosophy and fascism. He spends time specifically on Heidegger and Ezra Pound, who were two radical Nazis who are still revered by the academic left. He has lots of invaluable footnotes to Jewish historians who decry the reverence of post-WWII leftist scholars toward the academics and the ideas that led to fascism and the holocaust.

I got a lot of insight from this book into fascism and its parallels with the postmodern left. The footnotes were invaluable.

2.  Hitler’s Beneficiaries: Plunder, Racial War, and the Nazi Welfare State, Gotz Aly, 2008. Bob Wenzel has this to say about the book, “I originally recommended this book in the EPJ Daily Alert. It provides an extremely important lesson on how government can take your assets. Hitler did it to the Jews and also to the citizens of the many countries where German troops were occupying forces. If you know the many ways it was done in the past, the more you will be able to protect about such a possibility in the future. A word to the wise, read this book.”
3. Faciscm: The Career of a Concept, Paul E. Gottfried, 2016.
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FEDERAL REGULATION
1.  Ten Thousand Commandments, Harold M. Flemming, 1951.  Read more at Competitive Enterprise Institute.
2.  What the Anti-Federalists Were For: The Political Thought of the Opponents of the Constitution, Herbert J. Storing.
3.  Conspiracy in Philadelphia, Dr. Gary North, 1989.
4.  Costs of Federal Regulations, Dr. Gary North, 2014.
5.  Three Felonies a Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent, Harvey Silvergate, 2011.

FICTION
1. The Grand Banks Cafe (Inspector Maigret), Georges Simenon, 1938.
2.  Night Passage, Robert B. Parker, 2001.

FINANCE
1. The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford, 1963.
2.  Options for the Beginner and Beyond: Unlock the Opportunities and Minimize the Risks, 2012, W. Olmstead.
3.  Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Charles Kindleberger, 2000.
4.  Social Security Strategies: How to Optimize Retirement Benefits, William Reichenstein and William Meyer, 2017.
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U.S. FOREIGN POLICY
1.  Rothbard’s Strictly Confidential: The Private Folker Fund Memos of Murray Rothbard, 2010.  Excerpts here.
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FREEDOM
1.  The Discovery of Freedom, Rose Wilder Lane, 1943.
2.  The Mainspring of Human Progress, Henry Grady Weaver, 1923.

FRENCH REVOLUTION
1.  The French Revolution: A Study in Democracy, Nesta Helen Webster, 1919.  Gary North writes, “The two models are sometimes interlinked. They were interlinked in France in the years leading to the French Revolution (1789-94). The historian who denies the Freemasonic roots of that revolution is a poor historian. Most historians dismiss this connection. This is why Nesta Webster’s The French Revolution: A Study in Democracy (1919) remains the best history of the French Revolution. It is almost unknown today, and among historians who know of it, it is dismissed as “conspiracy history.” I read it in 1963, and it has shaped my view of the past. Download it here: http://www.garynorth.com/public/10774.cfm.”
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GET A JOB
1. Get a Job, Build a Real Career, and Defy a Bewildering Economy, Charles Hugh Smith.

(BIG) GOVERNMENT
1. The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money, Timothy P. Carney.

GOVERNMENT (or THE STATE)
1. The Anatomy of the State, Murray Rothbard.
2. The Rise and Decline of the State, by Martin van Creveld
3. Harry Truman and the Atomic Bomb, Ralph Raico.
4. Death by Government, R.J. Rummel.
5. China’s Bloody Century: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900, R. J. Rummel,2007.
6. Democide: Nazi Genocide and Mass Murder, R. J. Rummel, 1991.  Until you get the book, check out this site.
7. Lethal Politics: Soviet Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1917, R. J. Rummel, 1990.
8. Statistics of Democide: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900, Rudolph J. Rummel, 1998.
9. More resources by R. J. Rummel.

Rummel tells us:
After the capture of Bram in 1210, the Albigensian Crusaders, Christians all, took 100 captured soldiers and gouged out their eyes, cut off their noses and upper lips, and had them led by a one-eyed man to Cabaret, yet to be attacked. This was done to terrorize Cabaret into immediate surrender.

And . . .

Even the great emperor who unified China and gave it his name, Qin (pronounced Chin) Shihuang, buried alive 346 scholars in order to discourage opposition. Burying people alive seems to have been a favorite weapon of Chinese rulers and emperors. For example, when the ruler of Wei kingdom (Zaozao) conquered Xuzhou he buried alive several dozen thousand civilians.

Rummel also quotes Robert Payne:

[Chinese Emperor Chang Hsein-chung] set about all the merchants[in Chebgtu], then all the women and all the officials. Finally he ordered his own soldiers to kill each other. He ordered the feet of the officers’ wives to be cut off and made a mound of them, and at the top of the mound he placed the feet of his favorite concubines.

10.  The Bully Theory of the State, Gary North, July 19, 2014.  On Rousseau and the Social Contract.
11.  Government Pirates: The Assault on Private Property Rights and How We Can Fight It, Don Corace, 2008.
12.  Uncle Sam, the Monopoly Man, William C. Woolridge, 1970.
14.  Government by Emergency, Gary North, 1983.
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GREEK CIVILIZATION
1. The Ancient City: A Study on the Religions, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome, by Denis Fustel.
2. Worth reading:  RJ Rushdoony on Greek Civilization, Chapter 4.
3. A Peace to End All Peace:  The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East, David Fromkin.
4. Read the Greek & Latin Classical Works.
5.  Ancient City: Study on the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Rome and Greece, Numa Denis Fustel De Coulanges, 2001.
6.  The Idea of Progress: An Inquiry Into Its Origin and Growth, John Bagnell Bury, 2012.  See this link from Gary North; it has an online version of JB Bury’s book.

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HEALTH
1.  Healing Our World: The Compassion of Libertarianism, Dr. Mary J. Ruwart, 2015.  Interviewith
2.  50 Human Studies, in Utero, Conducted in Modern China Indicate Extreme Risk for Prenatal Ultrasound: A New Bibliography, James West, 2015.
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HOMES
1. The Owner-Builder and the Code: The Politics of Building Your Home, Ken Kern.
2. Mobile Homes.

HUMANITY AS RELIGION
1. Charles Burris provides a great list from which to read, plus Tom Woods interview of Linda Raeder on her new book, John Stuart Mill and the Religion of Humanity.  Here is a review of her book.
2. Humanitarianism Contested: Where Angels Fear to Tread (Routledge Global Institutions), Michael Barnett & Thomas Weiss, 2011.

IMMIGRATION
Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail, Ruben Martinez.

INFLATION
1. A Nation of Children,” Doug French.  This is the best thing I’ve read anywhere on the civil and social destruction brought on by inflation.  Read this:
Cantor points out that the elderly “become increasingly irrelevant” in an inflationary environment. It’s well known that inflation especially punishes those on fixed incomes. “Mann fills in our sense of the psychological disruptions that accompany the economic ravages of inflation,” writes Cantor. “More than any other factor, inflation discredits the authority of the older generation and turns power over to youth.”

With prices soaring, youthful vices look like wisdom; the conservatism and prudence of the elderly are made to look silly.

In his epic Democracy: The God That Failed, Hans-Hermann Hoppe explained that democracy increases societal time preference and with democratic rule “contrary to conventional wisdom, the decivilizing forces inherent in  any form of government are systematically strengthened.”

INSPIRATION
1. Controlling the Restless Mind,” Robert Ringer.
“There is much disagreement on who first put forth the thought “never less alone than when alone,” but whoever it was, he stated a beautiful truth.  Over the past forth years, I’ve only lived alone for eleven months, and it was the most peaceful time of my life.  Because my focus was on silence and tranquility, the endless chatter within me disappeared and my noise machine turned itself down so low that I could barely hear it.”
2. No Excuses!  The Power of Self-Discipline, Brian Tracy, 2011.

INSURANCE
1.  What’s Wrong With Your Life Insurance, Norman F. Dacey, 1989.
2.  8 Reasons to Avoid Whole Life Insurance.
3.  The Widow’s Handbook: A Guide for Living, Charlotte Foehner & Carol Cozart, 1987.

INTELLIGENCE
Every Spy a Prince: The Complete History of Israel’s Intelligence Community, Dan Raviv & Yossi Melman.  Does ISIS stand for Israeli Secret Intelligence Service? According to author Dan Raviv, it used to.

INTERVENTIONISM
1.  A Critique of Interventionism, Ludwig von Mises, 1929.
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INVESTING
1.  The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing.  A Book of Practical Counsel, Benjamin Graham, Jason Zweig & Warren Buffett, 2006.
2.  The New Scrooge Investing: The Bargain Hunter’s Guide to Thrifty Investments, Super Discounts, Special Privileges, and Other Money Saving Tips, Mark Skousen, 2000.
3.  The Permanent Portfolio: Harry Browne’s Long-Term Investment Strategy, Craig Rowland & J. M. Lawson, 2012.
4.  Winning the Loser’s Game, Timeles Strategies for Successful Investing, 6th Edition, Charles Ellis, 2013.
5.  What I Learned Losing a Million Dollars, Jim Paul & Brendan Moynihan, 2014.
6.  How to Buy Real Estate for at Least 20% Below Market Value, John T. Reed, 2007.
7.  How to Get Started In Real Estate Investment, John T. Reed, 2003.
8.  How to Use Leverage to Maximize Your Real Estate Investment Return: Sensible Finance Techniques for Real Estate Investors, John T. Reed, 1986.
9.  How to Increase the Value of Real Estate, John T. Reed, 1986.
10.  Aggressive Tax Avoidance for Real Estate Investors, John T. Reed, 1998.
11.  Business Plan in a Day: Getting It Done Right, Getting It Done Fast, Rhonda Abrams, 2005.
12.  Breaking Free to Mental and Financial Indepedence, Tim Piercing, 1985.
13.  Outwitting the Devil: The Secret to Freedom and Success, Napolean Hill, 2012.
14.  Thou Shall Prosper: 10 Commandments for Making Money, Daniel Lapin, 2009.
15.  The Millionaire Next Door, Thomas J. Stanley, 2010.
16.  The Richest Man in Babylon, George S. Clason, 1926, 1914.
17.  Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, Edwin Lefevre, aka, Jesse Livermore, 2006.
18.  Twenty Years of Inside Life or Revelations of the Personal Experience of a Speculator, William Worthington Fowler, 2016.  Robert Wenzel claims these 2 are  for beginning investors.
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IRAQ WAR
1.  The Shia Revival: How Conflicts Within Islam Will Shape the Future, Vali Nasr, 2007.

The Shia still fear Sunni rule, and Sunnis rue their loss of power and dream of climbing back to the top… Each has a different vision of the past and a different dream for the future. There are still scores to settle, decades of them.

To say again: the invasion in 2003 meant that the majority Shia became the new winners in post-Saddam Iraq; and the minority Sunnis the new losers. The former turned to their Shia brethren in Tehran for support; the latter turned to a Sunni insurgency that has morphed into a plethora of Sunni jihadists, including the Islamic State.

Now the chickens are coming home to roost. Sectarianism remains ascendant. The Iraqi state as the world has known it since the collapse of the Ottoman Empire nearly a century ago is coming apart. Portraits of Iran’s late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and his successor Ayatollah Ali Khamenei litter central Baghdad. And the only group capable of liberating Sunni strongholds, such as Tikrit and Mosul, from Sunni jihadists are the Iranian-backed Shia militias.

2. Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy, A Memoir, Christopher R. Hill, 2014.

One senior Bush administration official who never bought the neoconservative myths was Christopher Hill, a former ambassador to Iraq. In Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy [6], Hill argues:

The failure of neoconservatives and their fellow travellers to explain what they were trying to accomplish in Iraq remains one of the most disgraceful performances by a foreign policy class in America. It has been a failure to acknowledge mistakes, and a shameful effort to shift the blame, in the case of Iraq, to nameless intelligence analysts, as if they were responsible for the full-court pressure on President Bush to convince him to go to war. They quickly attacked Obama, and like architects who blame the builder, they never tire of offering bad advice then attack the implementers for not following their plans to the letter.

. . . they bear much responsibility for reducing America’s own discourse on foreign policy to little more than a barroom brawl. They have much to answer for. Perhaps, for starters, they could observe a period of silence while the rest of us try to deal with the practical realities of a difficult global structure.

According to Hill, “a majority-ruled Iraq, which necessarily involves Shia leadership” was never going to become “an inspiration to the Sunni-dominated Arab Middle East.” Nor was it likely to shun a close relationship with Shia Iran.

3.  Good article by Australian writer, Tom Switzer, 2015.

JFK
1.  Farewell to Justice: Jim Garrison, JFK’s Assassination, and the Case That Should Have Changed History, Joan Mellon, 2013.
2.  The Polka-Dot File: on the Robert F. Kennedy Assassination, Fernando Faura, 2016.  Be sure to see the review essay by Edwin Curtin at Global Research, dated July 16, 2016, titled The Polka Dot Dress, a review of Fernando Faura’s The Polka-Dot File: on the Robert F. Kennedy Assassination.
3.  JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, L. Fletcher Prouty, 1994.
4.  Crossfire: The Plot that Killed Kennedy, Jim Marrs, 1993.
5.  High Treason: The Assassination of JFK and the Case for ConspiracyHarrison Edward Livingstone and Robert J. Groden, 1998.

6.  JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters, James Douglas, 2010.
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JOB
1.  So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love, Cal Newport, 2012.
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LAS VEGAS
1.  The Money and the Power: The Making of Las Vegas and Its Hold on America, Sally Denton & Roger Morris, 2002.

LAW
See Law & Courts Page.

LEADERSHIP
1.  Leadership Is An Art, Max Depree, 2004.
2.  Harold S. Hook’s Model-Netics.
3.  Stronger Than Steel: The Wayne Anderson Story, R. C. Sproul, 1980,
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LEARNING
1. Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, Peter C. Brown.  Here is a pretty good review on learning that includes examples from this book.

LIBERTARIANISM
1. The Ayn Rand Cult, Jeff Walker, 1998.
2. Defending the Undefendable, Walter Block, 1976.
3. Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, 1957.
4. Benjamin R. Tucker.
5. Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick, 1975.
6. Examined Life, Robert Nozick, 1990.

Benjamin R. Tucker:
It is because peaceful agitation and passive resistance are, in Liberty’s hands, weapons more deadly to tyranny than any others that I uphold them, and it is because brute force strengthens tyranny that I condemn it.

War and authority are companions; peace and liberty are companions.

The methods and necessities of war involve arbitrary discipline and dictatorship. So-called “war measures” are almost always violations of rights.

Even war for liberty is sure to breed the spirit of authority, with aftereffects unforeseen and incalculable.

Liberty, July 31, 1886. (Thanks to Warren Bluhm)

7.  Ron Paul’s Recommended Reading List.
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LIFE INSURANCE
1.  How Your Life Insurance Policies Rob You: A Continuing Guide to Getting Maximum Insurance Protection for Minimum Dollars, Arthur Milton, 1990.
2.  What’s Wrong With Your Life Insurance?, Norman F. Dacey, 1989.
3.  A little extra insight on term or life insurance.  See this too.
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MAKING MONEY
1.  Thou Shall Prosper: Ten Commandments for Making Money, Daniel Lapin, 2009.
2.  The Richest Man in Babylon, George S. Clason, 1926, 1914.
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MANAGEMENT
1.  Peter Drucker.
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MARKETING
1.  On marketing.
2.  Ice to the Eskimos: How to Market a Product Nobody Wants, Jon Spoelstra, 2009.
3.  Waiting for Your Cat to Bark?  Persuading Customers When They Ignore Marketing, Bryan & Jeffrey Eiseberg, 2007.
4.  Positioning & Branding, Al Ries.
5.  No B. S. Grassroots Marketing: The Ultimate, No Holds Barred, Take No Prisoner Guide to Growing Sales and Profits of Local Small Business, Dan Kennedy & Jeff Slutsky, 2012.
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MEDIEVAL HISTORY
1. The Making of the Middle Ages, 1961/1967, R. W. Southern.  More on R. W. Southern.
2. St. Anselm: A Portrait in a Landscape, 1991, R. W. Southern.
3. Scholastic Humanism and the Unification of Europe: The Heroic Age, R. W. Southern, 2001.
4. St. Anselm and His Biographer, A Study of Monastic Life and Thought, 1059-1130,R. W. Southern, 1963.
5. Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages (History of the Church), R. W. Southern, 1970.
6. Inventing the Flat Earth: Columbus and Modern Historians, Jeffrey Burton Russell, 1991.
7. Medieval Civilization, Jeffrey Burton Russell, 1968.
8. History of Medieval Christianity, Dissent and Reform in the Early Middle Ages, Jeffrey Burton Russell, 2005.
9.  Dissent and Order in the Middle Ages: The Search for Legitimate Authority (Twayne’s Studies in Intellectual and Cultural History), Jeffrey Burton Russell, 1992.
10. Exposing Myth About Christianity: A Guide to Answering 145 Viral Lies and Legends, Jeffrey Burton Russell, 2012.
11. A History of Medieval Christianity: Prophecy and Order, Jeffrey Burton Russell, 1968.
12.  Kingship and Law in the Middle Ages: I. The Divine Right of Kings and the Right of Resistance in the Early Middle Ages; II. Law and Constitution in the Middle Ages, Fritz Kern, 2006.  Originally, 1914.
13.   “A History of Medieval Europe: From Constantine to Saint Louis (3rd Edition)”, by R.H.C. Davis, 2005.
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MIDDLE EAST
1. They Must Go, Rabbi Meir Kahane, 2012.
2. A Peace to End All Peace:  The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East, David Fromkin, 2001.
3. Sandstorm: Policy Failure in the Middle East, Leon Hadar, 2005.  Hadar’s American Conservative articles.
4. Treacherous Alliance: The Secret Dealings of Israel, Iran, and the United StatesTrita Parsi, 2008.
5. The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt, 2008.
6. Black Terror, White Soldiers: Islam, Fascism, and the New Age, David Livingstone, 2013.
7.  The High Walls of Jerusalem: A History of the Balfour Declaration and the Birth of the British Mandate for Palestine, Ronald Sanders, 1984.
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MILITARY
1. National Suicide: Military Aid to the Soviet Union, Anthony Sutton of the Hoover Institute.
2. The Pentagon Wars, Reformers Challenge the Old Guard, James Burton.
3. “The Troops Are Destroying the Country,” Jacob Hornberger, January 22, 2015.
4.  Base Nation: How U.S. Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World (American Empire Project), David Vine, 2015.
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MODERN WORLD HISTORY
1.  A History of the Modern World, 9th Edition, R. R. Palmer, Joel Colton, Lloyd Kramer, 2002.
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MONEY & THE FEDERAL RESERVE
1. The Battle of Breton Woods: John Maynard Keyens, Harry Dexter White, and the Making of a New World Order(Council on Foreign Relations Books: Princeton University), Benn Steil.
2. The Ethics of Money Production, Jorg Guido Hulsmann.
3.  The Monetary Sin of the West,  Jacques Rueff and Roger Glement, 1972.
4.  Frederic Bastiat, Jean Baptiste Say, and A. R. Turgot.
5.  If you want to be on the inside with respect to monetary theory, read serious discussions in books. Read Rothbard’s What Has Government Done to Our Money? Read Chapter 11 of his book Man, Economy, and State.
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MORALITY
1. The Wisdom of Lifeby Arthur Schopenhauer. This is the best place to start with this philosopher. An engaging, thought-provoking, short work. (And it is available on Amazon Kindle for $.99)
2. The World as Will and Representation, Volume 2. by Arthur Schopenhauer. This is his principal work. Volume 2, later written, is more readable than Volume 1, while it covers much of the same material.
3. The Basis of Moralityby Arthur Schopenhauer. It’s compassion, as he convincingly shows here in this book-length essay.
4. The Philosophy of Schopenhauerby Bryan Magee (1983). The best and by far the most readable analysis of Schopenhauer’s philosophy.
5. Broadway Danny Rose(DVD video) by Woody Allen (1984). This film is worth watching more than once.
6. Parsifal(DVD video) by Richard Wagner (1882). The 1993 Otto Schenk, Günther Schneider-Siemssen Metropolitan Opera production; with James Levine, Conductor; Siegfried Jerusalem, as Parsifal, Kurt Moll, as Gurnemanz; and a fabulous Waltraud Meier as Kundry.
7. A Guide to Parsifalby Richard Aldrich (1904). Published one year after the Metropolitan Opera premiered the opera in New York, the first performance of Parsifal outside of Bayreuth. A wonderful 73-page guide on the origins of Parsifal, the story of Wagner’s Parsifal, with an index of 33 musical motives. It remains in print, in paperback.
8. The Sociopath Next Doorby Martha Stout (2005). A fine work on the conscienceless 2% of the population given to actions steered by the motive of malice.
9. “The Philosophical Basis of the Conflict Between Liberty and Statism”(2003). This is another article I wrote for LewRockwell.com on Schopenhauer, explaining his defense of liberty and freedom and shows how his nemesis Hegel and his Marxist offspring got it all wrong.
10. This essay comes from Chapter 3 in my book Heart in Hand(1999), “The Philosophical, Moral, and Medical Importance of Compassion,” (available here). It is a somewhat altered and shortened version of that chapter. (The entire book is downloadable on my website.)

MUSIC
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NEGOTIATING
1.  Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It, Chris Voss, 2016.
2.  Bargaining With the Devil: When to Negotiate, When to Fight, Robert Mnookin, 2011.
3.  Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In, Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton, 2011.
4.  Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, 2013.
5.  Lessons of Waco: Proposed Changes in Federal Law Enforcement, Philip B. Heymann, Deputy Attorney General, Washington D.C.: US Department of Justice, 1993.
6.  George A. Miller, “The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information,” Psychological Review 63, no. 2, (1956):81-97
7.  Start With NO: The Negotiating Tools That the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, Jim Camp, 2002.
8.  You Can Negotiate Anything, Herb Cohen, 1980.
9.  How to Become a Rainmaker: The People Who Get and Keep Customers, Jeffrey J. Fox, 2000.
10.  Split-Second Persuasion: The Ancient Art and New Science of Changing Minds, Kevin Dutton, 2011.
11.  Teacher’s Manual With Course Materials and Problems for Negotiation to Accompany Legal Negotiations and Settlements, Gerald R. Williams, 1983.
12.  Negotiation Genius: How to Overcome Obstacles and Achieve Brilliant Results at the Bargaining Table and Beyond, Deepak Malhorta and Max H. Bazerman, 2007.
13.  Negotiation Boot Camp: How to Resolve Conflict, Satisfy Customers, and Make Better Deals, Ed Brodow, 2014.
14.  Secrets of Power Negotiating: Inside Secrets from a Master Negotiator, Roger Dawson, 2010.
15.  Power Negotiations: Secrets of the Pros [Real Estate Investor Training], Jack Miller, 2013.
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NEOCONSERVATISM
1. An Introduction to Neoconservatism, Gary North.
2. Anatomy of NeoConservatism, David Gordon.
3. NeoCon’s legacy, Lew Rockwell.
4. Paul Godfried Against the Neoconservatives
Gary North points out that “Conservatives were determined to spread American democracy to China, 1946 to 1990. See the history of the so-called “Committee of One Million,” which had a few thousand supporters. The Korean War Vietnam War was based on this ideology. So was the Vietnam War. Anti-Communism was a serious deal.

Social issues were always muted prior to ROE V. WADE. It was all about taxes, politics, and anti-Communism.

The biggest social issue was the Civil Rights movement, 1955-70. Conservatives were opposed to it. But, outside the South, it was not a major issue.”

and further . . . ,

” There is a difference between society and state. Conservatism recognizes this. So does libertarianism. Liberalism no longer does.

Barton’s work emphasizes the Christian society, but he fails to provide anything like conclusive evidence that the nation was Christian politically after 1788. The evidence is strongly to the contrary.

Compare Mussolini’s statement, “Everything within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state . . . .”

OCCULT
1.  Unholy Spirits, Gary North, 1994.

Unholy Spirits demonstrates beyond a shadow of a doubt the active existence of demonic forces in our rational, humanistic 20th century. What is even more unnerving, however, is Dr. Gary North’s argument that the fundamentals of humansim are identical with the basics of Satanism. This is not to say that all humanists are demonists. But it does mean that a commitment to the philosophy of humanism is no longer a shield against the demonic. It does not prevent men from dabbling in the occult or even embracing it. Nor does it prevent a radical new class of scientists from opening up a Pandora’s box of satanic experimentation which could change the way that you live. As C. S. Lewis’ demon, Screwtape, wrote to his nephew Wormwood in The Screwtape Letters, when the materialists believe in demons but not in God, the battle is over.

This is Gary North’s update of his long out-of-print None Dare Call It Witchcraft. He has researched this field for 30 years. Unholy Spirits is much larger and fuller than his earlier study. The book shows that the theory of autonomous man that undergirds humanism has always been accompanied by a rise in occultism. The two appear to be rivals, but culturally, they are twins.
2.  The Occult: A History, Colin Wilson, 1971.
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ORIGINS
1. Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution, Francis Fukuyama, 2011.
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PARETO’S LAW
1.  The 80/20 Principle: The Secret to Achieving More With Less, Richard Koch, 2011.
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POLICE STATE
1. The War State: The Cold War Origins of the Military-Industrial Complex and the Power Elite, 1945-1963, Michael Swanson.

POLITICALLY CORRECT, PC, or THOUGHT POLICE
1.  Social Justice Warriors Always Lie: Taking Down the Thought Police, VOX Day, 2015.
2.  Myth of Overpopulation, R. J. Rushdoony (1916-2001), 1969.  See Rushdoony’s productive list.
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POLITICS
1. Nixon’s Secrets: The Rise, Fall, and Untold Truth About the President, Watergate, and the Pardon, Roger Stone.
2. The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ, Roger Stone.
3. Want to Know Jeb Bush?
4. “What Kind of Person Runs for Public Office?,” Doug French, 2010.
5.  Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Government and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich, Peter Schweizer, 2015.
6.  Pretty good insights from Atash on politics and western demons.
7.  Henry Kissinger: The Secret Side of the Secretary of State, Gary Allen, 1994.  Kissinger is the heart, mind, and soul of the CFR.
8.  The Minority Report, H.L. Mencken, 1956.
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POVERTY
1.  Generational Poverty.  An Economic Look at the Culture of the Poor, Adam D. Vass Gal, 2015.

PRESIDENTS
1. Recarving Rushmoore: Ranking the Presidents on Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty, Ivan Eland.
2. Nixon’s Secrets: The Rise, Fall, and Untold Truth About the President, Watergate, and the Pardon, Roger Stone.  The following is a terrific interview and preview of the illuminating details of the book and Nixon’s presidency.

3.  The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles and Their Secret World War, StephenKinzer, 2013.

4.  LBJ: Architect of American Ambition, Randall B. Woods, 2007.
5.  Operation Cyanide: How the Bombing of the USS Liberty Nearly Caused World War Three, Peter Hounam, 2003.
6.  Lone Star Rising: Vol. 1, Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1908-1960, Robert Dallek, 1992.
7.  The Life and Times of Lyndon Johnson, Ronnie Dugger, 1984.
8.  Dexter King, son of MLK, claims on national TV that LBJ arranged for the murder of his father, NYT, 1997.

Lyndon Johnson died in January, 1973. J. Edgar Hoover had died in May, 1972. Allen Dulles died in January, 1969.

9.  Murder from Within: Lyndon Johnson’s Plot Against President Kennedy, Fred Newcomb, 1974.

LBJ as functional psychopath.

10.  The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House, Kate Andersen Brower, 2015.  Recommended by this post.
11.  Partners in Power: The Clintons and Their America, Roger Morris, 1999.
12.  Compromised: Clinton, Bush, and the CIA, Terry Reed & John Cummings, 1994.
13.  LBJ: From Mastermind to “The Colossus”, Philip F. Nelson, 2014.
14.  Martin van Buren and the Making of the Democratic Party, Robert Remini, 1970.
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PROGRESSIVES
1.  Ministers of Reform: Progressives’ Achievement in American Civilization, 1889-1920, Robert M. Crunden, 1985.
2.  Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics, and American Economics in the Progressive Era, Thomas C. Leonard, 2016.
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PSYCHOLOGY
1.  Albert Ellis.
2.  Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, 2008.
3.  Getting from Here to There: Analytic Love, Analytic Process, Sheldon Bach, 2014.
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PURITANS
1.  Edmund S. Morgan on the Puritan era. He is a great writer, and a specialist in American Puritanism. Visible Saints, 1963. His book, The Puritan Family, 1942, was his doctoral dissertation.
2.  Antonia Fraser’s biography of Cromwell was a bestseller, and deserves to be.
3.  The Puritan Hope: A Study in Revival and the Interpretation of Prophecy, Ian Murray, 1971.
4.  Keith Thomas’s magisterial opus, Religion and the Decline of Magic, 2012.  This is one of the most extraordinary history books ever written. The footnotes will boggle your mind. It is an important topic.
5.  It is unfortunate that one of the greatest historians of the Puritans was a Marxist: Christopher Hill. Read any of his books, but don’t expect a real understanding of the theology of Puritanism. Pay close attention to his analysis of their social and economic views. Here, he was a master.
6.  Read the Putney debates between Cromwell’s son-in-law, Ireton, and a representative of the Democratic faction, Rainsboro. These have been in print for over 75 years.
7.  The main publisher of primary source documents from the era is the Banner of Truth Trust. These books focus on the pietism of Puritanism, not the social views.

RACE
1.  Jack Kerwick, “Interracial Attacks That the Anti-Racist Media Ignored” at Townhall.com.
2. Fred Reed on Race Relations in America.
3.  An American Dilemma: The Negor Problem and Modern Democracy (Black & African-American Studies), Gunnar Myrdal, 1996.
4.  Pick a Better Country: An Unassuming Colored Guy Speaks His Mind About America, Ken Hamblin, 1996.
5.  America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible, Stephen and Abigail Thernstrom, 1999.
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REGULATION
1.  Working to Rule: The Damaging Economics of UK Employment Regulation, J.R. Shackleton and Philip Booth, 2017.
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REVISIONIST WRITERS
1. Harry Elmer Barnes.  Rothbard on Barnes’role in revisionist history, he says “He was the father and the catalyst for all of World War II revisionism, as well as personally writing numerous articles, editing and writing for the revisionist symposium Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, and launching the whole struggle immediately after the war with the first of numerous editions of his hard-hitting, privately printed brochure, Struggle Against the Historical Blackout.  Fortunately, Harry lived long enough to see the tied begin inexorably to turn among the historical profession, to see a New Left emerge that is beginning to call into question not only America’s current imperial wars but also World War II itself: especially in the work of William Appleman Williams and his students in modern American history.  To his friends and colleagues the fact that Harry lived to see the emergence of his own vindication after so many years is the only slight consolation for suffering his loss.”

William Appleman Williams.

ROMAN HISTORY
1. History of Rome, Michael Grant, 1978.  Michael Grant (1914-2004) was a historian whose over forty publications on ancient Rome and Greece popularised the classical and early Christian world. He studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, served in intelligence and as a diplomat during the Second World War, and afterwards became deputy director of the British Council’s European division, when he also published his first book. He later returned to academia, teaching at Cambridge and Edinburgh, and serving as Vice Chancellor at the University of Khartoum and at Queen’s University, Belfast. –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.  Other books by Grant.
2.  Christ & the Caesars, Ethelbert Stauffer, 2008.
3.  Christianity and Classical Culture, Charles Norris Cochrane, 2003.

RUSSIAN HISTORY
1.  A Concise History of the Russian Revolution, Richard Pipes, 1996.
2.  Breaking Stalin’s Nose, Eugene Yelchin, 2011.
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SALES & SUCCESS
1.  How I Raised Myself Up From Failure, Frank Bettger, 2009.
2.  How I Multiplied My Income and Happiness in Selling, Frank Bettger, 1990.
3.  Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time, Keith Ferrazi, 2005.
4.  The Secret of Selling Anything, Harry Browne, 1969.
5.  Aligning Strategy and Sales: The Choices, Systems, and Behaviors That Drive Effective SellingFrank V. Cespedes, 2014.  $46!!! Give a listen to a review of his book.
6.  Common Sense Sales Scripting: How to Use Sales Scripting to Supercharge Your Selling, Michael Senoff, 2011. $3 on 2/24/2015.
7.  The Sales Script Book: Proven Responses to the Toughest Questions, Gerhard Gschwandtner, 2008.
8.  The 60-Second Sales Hook: How to Stand Out and Sell More Using the Power of Your Story, Kevin Rogers, 2014.
9.  Million Dollar Habit: Ten Simple Steps to Getting Everything You Want in Life, Robert Ringer, 2014.
10.  To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others, Daniel H. Pink, 2013.
11.  A Foot In The Door – The Life Appraisal Of The Original Fuller Brush Man, Alfred C. Fuller (1885-1973), 1960.
12.  The Robert Collier Letter Book, Robert Collier, 2013.
13.  Breakthrough Advertising, Eugene Schwartz, 2004.
14.  So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love, Cal Newport, 2012.
15.  Selling to VITO: The Very Important Top Officer (Increase Your Commissions by Getting Appointments with Top Decision Makers Today!), Anthony Parinello, 1999.
16.  Getting Everything You Can Out of All You’ve Got: 21 Ways You Can Out-Think, Out-Perform, Out-Earn Your Compeition, Jay Abraham, 2000.
17.  Secrets of Closing the Sale, Zig Ziglar, 1985.
18.  Selling 101: What Every Successful Sales Professional Needs to Know, Zig Ziglar, 1991.
19.  The 8 Type of Sales People from the Harvard Business Review
20.  How Power Selling Brought Me Success in 6 Hours, Pierce Posey, 2012.
21.  Selling 101: What Every Successful Sales Professional Needs to Know, Zig Ziglar, 1991.
22.  The Irresistible Offer: How to Sell Your Product or Service in 3 Seconds or Less, Mark Joyner, 2005.
23.  Grant Cardone books on sales.  And here is his university.
24.  No More Cold Calls:  The Complete Guide to Generating–And Closing–All the Prospects You Need to Become a Multi-Millionaire by Selling Your Service, Jeffrey Lant, 1993.
25.  How to Sell at Margins Higher Than Your Competitors: Winning Every Sale at Full Price, Rate, or Fee, Lawrence L. Steinmetz and William T. Brooks, 2005.
26.  Yes! 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive, Noah Goldstein, Steve J Martin, and Robert Cialdini, 2009.
27.  http://www.garynorth.com/public/department38.cfm.
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SCIENCE
1.  The Mythology of Science, Rousas John Rushdoony, 1967.  Gary North makes some interesting points

The United States spends $1 trillion a year on education, and by law, all of it is Darwinian. Darwinism reigns supreme in every academic discipline. This has been true since at least 1900.

You cannot get tenure if you hold the creationist position in biology or geology. If they find out when you’re in grad school, you will not receive your PhD.

Science is Darwinian by legal definition in public education. The United States Supreme Court is declared this repeatedly. Those who don’t hold to Darwininsm are on the periphery of American thought and culture. There is not a single PhD degree-granting university in the world that teaches six-day creation. There never has been.

2.  The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn, 1962.  Kuhn was a physicist and historian of the history of science, introduced a thesis which, thought not really novel in humanities, was a blockbuster in the natural sciences.
3.  Ideology and Utopia: An Introduction to the Sociology of Knowledge, Karl Mannheim, 1936, served a few serious scholars as a kind of Bible of relativism.
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SELF-DEFENSE
1. The Law of Self-Defense: The Indispensable Guide to the Armed Citizen, 2nd Edition, Andrew F. Branca.
2. Arrest-Proof Yourself, Dale Carson.
3.  Spy Secrets that Can Save Your Life: A Former CIA Officer Reveals Safety and Survival Techniques to Keep You and Your Family Protected, Jason Hanson 2015.
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SLAVERY
1.  Without Consent or Contract: The Rise and Fall of American Slavery, Robert William Fogel, 1994.
2.  Speculators and Slaves: Masters, Traders, and Slaves in the Old South, Michael Tadman, 1989.
3.  Slavery in Brazil and the United States: An Essay in Comparative History, Carl N. Degler, The American Historical Review, Vol. 75, No. 4 (Apr., 1970), pp. 1004-1028.  [You can sign up for a free subscription, letting you get up to 3 articles.]
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SOCIALISM
1.  Cliches of Socialism.
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SOUTHERNERS
1.  Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, Robert Lewis Dabney, 2013.
2.  Stonewall Jackson, James Robertson, 1997.
3.  Robert E. Lee: A Biography, Pulitzer Prize Edition, Douglas Southall Freeman, 1936.
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SPORTS
1.  No Contest: The Case Against Competition, Alfie Kohn, 1992.
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STATE TERRORISM
1.  Dying to Win: The Strategic of Suicide Terrorism, Robert Pape, 2006.
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SUCCESS
1.  The Notebooks of Lazarus Long, Robert Heinlein, 1978.
2.  Scout Law?
3.  How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life, Scott Adams, 2014.
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TAXATION
1. To Harass Our People: The IRS and Government Abuse of PowerGeorge Hansen.
2. On his passingon August 14, 2014.  Here is Will Grigg’s eulogy on Hansen.
3. How the IRS Seizes Your Dollars and How to Fight Back, George Hansen.
4. The Income Tax: The Root of All Evil, Frank Chodorov.
5. “Taxation Is Robbery,” Frank Chodorov.
6. The Tax Foundation.
7.  “The Nature of the State,” Chapter 22 from The Ethics of Liberty, Murray Rothbard.
8. “Ten Great Economic Myths,” Chapter 2 from Making Economic Sense, Murray Rothbard.
9. “Binary Intervention: Taxation,” from Chapter 4 in Power and Market, Murray Rothbard.
10. The American Revolution Was a Mistake, Gary North.  Taxation in Colonial America.
11. Taxation is Slavery, Charles Burris.
12. The International Man, Doug Casey and others.
13. Peter Schiff’s EuroPac.net.

TECHNOLOGY
Stratosphere: Integrating Technology, Pedagogy, and Change Knowledge, Michael Fullan. Here is a review of Fullan’s book.

TERRORISM
1.  Dying to Win: The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism, Robert A. Pape, 2006.
2.  Bombing to Win: Air Power & Coercion in War, Robert A. Pape, 1996.
3.  Cutting the Fuse: The Explosion of Global Suicide Terrosism and How to Stop It, Robert A. Pape, 2010.
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THOUGHT
1.  Gorilla Mindset: How to Control Your Thoughts and Emotions and Live Life on Your Terms, Mike Cernovich, 2015.
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TRADING 
1. Options for the Beginner ad Beyond: Unlock the Opportunities and Minimize the Risks, W. Olmstead.  And here are some free online training courses on options.  Worth a look.
2. The Stock Market, Credit, and Capital Formation, Fritz Machlup, 2007.

UNIONS, LABOR
1.  from the Mises Institute.
2.  Power and Privilege: Labor Unions in America, Morgan Reynolds, 1984.

Please Stop Helping Us, Jason L. Riley, 2014.  Here is an article that reviews the book and how awful the unions were toward blacks.

Author Jason Riley, in his recent book “Please Stop Helping Us,” says “when (politicians) moved to implement federal minimum-wage laws and Davis-Bacon statues … it is crystal clear that Congress passed these statues to protect white union workers from competition from nonunion blacks … We still have the transcripts.”

The solution is obvious. Just use unions who have a membership that reflect the surrounding area’s racial composition. In 1933 there were about 2.25 million union members. Two percent were black. In 1930, however, blacks were formally barred from union membership in 26 national unions. There goes that solution.

Responding to President Franklin Roosevelt’s National Industrial Recovery act, the NAACP in 1934 noted that, “Union labor strategy seems to be to form a union, strike to obtain the right to bargain … and close the union to black workers.” This act was later ruled unconstitutional, but to the blacks of the day, the National Recovery Administration (NRA) was commonly known as the Negro Removal Act. It was very effective.

Has There Ever Been a Time When the Unemployment Rate . . .
Right to Work Law in Wisconsin, Gary North, February 27, 2015.

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VETERANS
1.  Compelling veteran stories.
2.  Veterans for Peace website.
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VIETNAM WAR
1.  Background to Betrayal: The Tragedy of Vietnam, Hilaire du Berrier, 1965.
2.  Kill Anything that Moves, Nick Turse, 2013.
3.  Rev. Emmanuel Charles McCarthy’s “A True Hero of the Vietnam War . . . .
4. Philip Jones Griffiths’ pictures of the Vietnam War are here and here.  As you can expect from war pictures, there are some terrible pictures of injured civilians, soldiers, men, women, and children.
5.  “Vietnam Falls: It Is Time to Establish Responsibility.”
6.  Teaching the Vietnam War: A Critical Examination of School Texts and an Interpretive, Comparative History Using the Pentagon Papers and Other Documents, William L. Griffen and John Marciano, 1979.
7.  The American War in Vietnam: Crime or Commemoration? John Marciano, 2016.  On John Marciano, Laurence M. Vance writes “John Marciano is Professor Emeritus at SUNY Cortland and the author (with William Griffen) of Teaching the Vietnam War (1979). He is also “an antiwar and social justice activist.” The author is also a myth buster, for in his new book on the Vietnam War he destroys myth after myth about the war. He also challenges the dominant view that “U.S. wars are just and honorable, fought for a Noble Cause, the essence of which is the belief that the United States is ‘a unique force for good in the world, superior not only in its military and economic power, but in the quality of its government and institutions, the character and morality of its people, and its way of life.”
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WALL STREET
1. Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution, Anthony Sutton.
2. The Wall Street Gang, Richard Ney.
3. The Wall Street Jungle, Richard Ney.
4. Battling Wall Street: The Kennedy Presidency, Donald Gibson.
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WAR
1.  On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society, David Grossman, 2009.  “Lt. Col. Grossman was a Psychology Professor at West Point and his most famous books are… His books are on the required reading list of the USMC Commandant, and all the Military Academies and many Military Schools.”
2.  On Combat: The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and in Peace, David Grossman, 2008.
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WATERGATE
1.  White House Call Girl: The Real Watergate Story, Phil Stanford, 2013.

WEALTH
1.  Wealth & Poverty, George Gilders, 1993.
2.  Wealth & Poverty: Four Christian Views of Economics, 1984.
3.

WELFARE
1.  From Mutual Aid to the Welfare Society: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 1890-1967, David T. Beito, 2000.
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WESTERN CIVILIZATION
1. The Great Conversation: The Substance of a Liberal Education, Robert Maynard Hutchins, 1955.
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WRITING
1.  On Writing Well, 30th Anniversary Edition: An Informal Guide to Writing Nonfiction, William Zinsser, 2012.
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WWI
1. The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914, Christopher Clark.
2. Eric Margolis explains, “The problem is that too many cooks in Washington are spoiling its Mideast soup. In his magnificent new book, The Sleepwalkers, Prof. Christopher Clark of Cambridge describes how World War I was in part ignited by small numbers of anti-German officials in France, Russia, Serbia and Britain who often undermined their own government’s moderate policies.”
3. Here is an interesting review of the Huns, a.k.a. Germans, of WWI.
4. America Goes to War, Charles Callan Tansill.
5. The Illusion of Victory: America in World War I, Thomas Fleming.
6. Here is a review of Flemming’s book by David Gordon.
7. Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth, John Garth.
8.  War by Timetable: How the First World War Began, A J P Taylor, 2013.
9.  The Great War: Western Front and Home Front, Hunt Tooley, 2016.

The 1930 movie, All Quiet on the Western Front, may serve as one of the better anti-war movies of all time.

10.  A Century of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order, F. William Engdahl, 2012.
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WWII
1. Back Door to War: The Roosevelt Foreign Policy, 1933-1941, Charles Callan Tansill, 1952.  Dr. Gary North points out that “When the premier American diplomatic historian, Charles C. Tansill, said [that US officials had foreknowledge of Pearl Harbor] again in 1952 in his Back Door to War (Regnery), he, too, was shoved down the liberals’ memory hole.”
2. Great Wars and Great Leaders: A Libertarian Rebuttal, Ralph Raico.
3. The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, Gar Alperovitz.
4. Great Mistakes of the War, Hanson W. Baldwin.  Baldwin was the principal writer for The New York Times, who covered World War II and he wrote this important book immediately after the war.  Dulles recalled that on July 20, 1945, under instructions from Washington, that he went to the Potsdam Conference and reported there to Secretary [of War] Stimson on what he had learned from Tokyo–that they desired to surrender if they could retain the Emperor and their constitution as a basis for maintaining discipline and order in Japan after the devastating news of surrender became known to the Japanese people.  It is documented by Alperovitz that Stimson reported this directly to Truman.  Alperovitz further points out in detail the documentary proof that every top presidential civilian and military adviser, with the exception of James Byrnes, along with Prime Minister Churchill and his top British military leadership, urged Truman to revise the unconditional surrender policy so as to allow the Japanese to surrender and keep their Emperor.  All this advice was given to Truman prior to the Potsdam Proclamation which occurred on July 26, 1945.  This proclamation made a final demand upon Japan to surrender unconditionally or suffer drastic consequences.  [from John Denson’s “The Hiroshima Lie.”]
5. Roosevelt and Stalin: The Failed Courtship, by Robert Nisbet.
6. Guilt by Association: How Deception and Self-Deceit Took America to War, Jeff Gates.
7. Defend America First: Anti-War Editorials from the Saturday Evening Post, 1939-1942, Garet Garrett. A brief review.
8. The New Dealers‘ War: FDR and the War With World War II, Thomas Fleming, 2002.
9. The Origins of the Second World War, A. J. P. Taylor, 1996.
10. My Battle Against Hitler: Faith, Truth, and Defiance in the Shadow of the Third Reich, Dietrich von Hildebrand and John Henry Crosby, 2014.  Here is a review of the book and author.
11. Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, Harry Elmer Barnes, 1953.  This is a review of one of the chapters.

Gary North points out that “The final product of the Council on Foreign Relations’ investment of $139,000 in 1946 — a lot of money in 1946 — was the standard Establishment history of the coming of the war, written by William L. Langer and S. Everett Gleason, The Challenge to Isolation: The World Crisis of 1937-1940 and American Foreign Policy (1952). It was still the standard account two decades later. Its perspective remains dominant on campus today. Langer was a professor of history at Harvard. So was Gleason — medieval history — until he moved to Washington after Pearl Harbor, to join the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the precursor of the CIA. He later became the official historian of the State Department. Establishment enough for you? (The other standard book was Herbert Feis’s Road to Pearl Harbor (1950). He had served as the State Department’s Advisor for International Economic Affairs.) Yes, the victors always write the history books, but when the historians are actually policy-setting participants in the war, the words “court history” take on new meaning.”

12. Gary North mentions this book, The Road to Pearl Harbor: The Coming of the War Between the United States and Japan, 1950, by Herbert Feis in his talk on War Revisionism.
13.  William Langer, Chief of Research and Analysis throughout the war.
14.  Sarell Everett Gleason, Chief for the Offices of Strategic Services for the war.

15.  Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath, John Toland, 1972.
16.  Pearl Harbor: The Seeds and Fruits of Infamy, Percy Greaves, Jr., 2010,  The Mises Institute says that “For 70 years, Greaves’s documents have been the primary source of revisionist scholarship on Pearl Harbor. These documents were prepared under his leadership as main counsel for the Republican minority on the Joint Congressional Committee that investigated Pearl Harbor from 1945 to 1946.”  Gary North points out that “He was the Republican counsel in the Pearl Harbor Hearings. The Mises Institute published it.”

17.  Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor, Robert StinnettDay of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor
18.  President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War, 1941: A Study in Appearances and Realities, Charles A. Beard, 1968.
19.  Pearl Harbor: The Story of the Secret War, George Morgenstern, 1947. North sums it up: “Consider the conservatives’ account of Roosevelt’s advance warning of the Japanese attack in late 1941. When George Morgenstern wrote Pearl Harbor: The Story of a Secret War, only right-wing Devin-Adair would publish it (1947). The book was ridiculed by academic historians as being a pack of unsubstantiated opinions written by a mere journalist — and a Chicago Tribune journalist at that.”
20.  Paying for a World War: The United States Financing of World War II, Jarvis M. Morse, 1946.  Here is an online copy.

As to the consequeneces of World War II, Dr. North points to Chalmers Johnsons’ Blowback series.  Wikipedia states it like this:

“Johnson believed that the enforcement of American hegemony over the world constitutes a new form of global empire. Whereas traditional empires maintained control over subject peoples via colonies, since World War II the US has developed a vast system of hundreds of military bases around the world where it has strategic interests. A long-time Cold Warrior, he applauded the dissolution of the Soviet Union: “I was a cold warrior. There’s no doubt about that. I believed the Soviet Union was a genuine menace. I still think so.”[9] At the same time, however, he experienced a political awakening after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, noting that instead of demobilizing its armed forces, the US accelerated its reliance on military solutions to problems both economic and political. The result of this militarism (as distinct from actual domestic defense) is more terrorism against the U.S. and its allies, the loss of core democratic values at home, and an eventual disaster for the American economy. Of four books he wrote on this topic, the first three are referred to as The Blowback Trilogy . . . . ”  I liked Johnson’sdistinction regarding the different kinds of empire.

21.  Edwin P. Hoyt on Japanese conflict in WWII.
22.  Shirer, Rise and Fall of the 3rd Reich.
23.  The Permanent War Economy, Seymour Melman, 1976.
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9/11
1.  Barbar Honegger: Exposing the Deep State.  In this video, researcher Barbara Honegger will present the compelling evidence for why: 1) The Pentagon attack is the central attack of 9/11, without which there could not have been a ‘War’ on Terror; 2) The Real Story of 9/11 is pre-placed explosives at both the WTC and the Pentagon; 3) The Pentagon attack, like the WTC attacks, cannot have been executed by any foreign terrorists; 4) The Official Conspiracy Theory Lie of who attacked this country on 9/11 has been for 15 years, and still is, the ‘legal’ pretext for all U.S. invasions, occupations and deadly attacks in the M.E. and N. Africa. Concerning 911, Barbara’s authoritative work is “Behind the Smoke Curtain: What Happened at the Pentagon on 9/11, and What Didn’t, and Why It Matters.

Barbara Honegger worked as a researcher at the Hoover Institution before joining the Ronald Reagan administration as a researcher and policy analyst in 1980. She was the Director of the Attorney General’s Anti-Discrimination Law Review at the Department of Justice. After leaving Washington, she became the Senior Military Affairs Journalist for the Naval Postgraduate School.

While working for Reagan she discovered information that convinced her that George H. W. Bush and William Casey had conspired to make sure that Iran did not release the U.S. hostages until Jimmy Carter had been defeated in the 1980 presidential election.

In 1987 Honegger began leaking information to journalists about the Reagan administration. However, it was not until Reagan left office that Honegger published October Surprise (1989). In her book, Honegger claimed that in 1980 William Casey and other representatives of the Reagan presidential campaign made a deal at two sets of meetings in July and August at the Ritz Hotel in Madrid with Iranians to delay the release of Americans held hostage in Iran until after the November 1980 presidential elections. Reagan’s aides promised that they would get a better deal if they waited until Carter was defeated.

In the years since October Surprise was published other sources such as Ari Ben-Menashe, an Iranian-born Israeli businessman, security consultant and author, who was previously an employee of Israel’s Military Intelligence Directorate from 1977 to 1987 and an arms dealer; premier investigative journalist Robert Parry, who has authored numerous books and articleson the October Surprise; and Gary Sick, who served on the staff of the National Security Council under President Carter, have come forward to confirm Honegger’s story. Sick is the author of a book also entitled October Surprise. He was the principal White House aide for Persian Gulf affairs from 1976 to 1981, a period which included the Iranian revolution and the hostage crisis. After leaving government service, Sick served as Deputy Director for International Affairs at the Ford Foundation from 1982 to 1987, and is the executive director of the Gulf/2000 Project at Columbia University (1993–present), which has published five books and numbers many of the leading scholars on the Persian Gulf among its global membership. He is an adjunct professor of International Affairs and a senior research scholar at Columbia’s School of International & Public Affairs, where he has been voted one of the top professors. He is emeritus member of the board of directors of Human Rights Watch, and serves as founding chair of the Advisory Committee of Human Rights Watch/Middle East.

2.  Citizen Journalism, June 15, 2009.
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BOOK LISTS
Ron Unz’s list: unz.org.
Recommended by Ilana Mercer.
Edwards Deming

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